What are these January-sprouting bulbs? (Portland, OR)

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hm, this seems to be less full of pop-ups:
http://www.arthurleej.com/p-o-m-Mar02.html
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Adam Schneider wrote:

[snip url to pictures]
Oh, yes, I have that. Attractive little thing, isn't it? It doesn't seem to win the fight against some of the other, less attractive weeds I get, so I bear it no animosity.
I may have to try it in a salad, isn't Ann useful?
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Kathryn Burlingham wrote:

Grape hyacinth isn't hyacinth. It's muscari.
Muscari started sprouting in October/November. What's in the picture isn't muscari.
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Warren H.

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Warren wrote:

Yes, I know.

Well the leaves are wrong, now that I go look at the picture. I don't have any grape hyacinth in my yard, but I have a friend who does, and I usually see them starting to bloom early spring.
Anyway, Warren, I'm sure you know scads more about gardening and plants than I do, we'll just take that as stipulated, shall we?
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There are many commonly gardened muscari species & some wait until winter's end or spring before they appear, others are grassy starting in Autumn, still others earlier in winter.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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Our garden has lots of these even though we are a long way away in the UK. They are Bluebells, but if you are lucky some of the flowers may be pink or white as well as blue. There is no need to worry about shade for them as the flowers will be over before the shade gets too deep.If you want them to continue flowering next year it is important to leave the leaves to die back naturally to feed the bulbs (at least 6 weeks after the flowers die).
Adam Schneider wrote:

bulbs,
summer,
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Yes, they look like bluebells to me too. Unfortunately, I don't thin
they are Hyacinthoides non scripta, the delicate English bluebell tha creates a beautiful haze of blue in woodlands in May. Instead I thin these are Hyacinthoides hispanica (known as Spanish bluebells). The come into leaf much earlier than the English ones and the leaves ar thicker and strap-like. They are generally a bigger plant, with paler sometimes wishy-washy blue-violet flowers. The problem with them is tha they are rampant growers - spreading very fast and also hybridising wit English bluebells. That may not pose a problem where you are, but yo might get fed up with trying to eradicate them from parts of you garden where you don't want them. The bulbs go really deep too, s they are hard to dig out. DiSansom Wrote:

-- Ornata
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Back in January, I wrote:

An update, if anyone cares: it turns out they're Spanish Bluebells. Give yourself a pat on the back if that was your guess. :)
http://adamschneider.net/misc/mysterybulb.html#update
They sure do take up a lot of space, but I'm not too bothered, as our front "yard" is just covered in bark mulch anyway. If they interfere with our new Star Magnolia or Mexican Oranges, though, I'll start kicking some bluebell butt.
Adam
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They will have absolutely no effect on your magnolias or oranges. Just leave them alone until all the leaves turn brown, then trim and wait for next years bloom. I've had clumps in my garden around roses, St John's Wort, pansies, spieria, lilacs, etc. and they've never caused a problem.
You may want to thin them every 5 - 6 years. Just dig deep enough to find the bulbs, seperate them, and replant.
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