What are my options for fixing this chewed up drip irrigation setup?

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This drip irrigation setup for a tomato garden is all chewed up:

So I figured I'd replace it with something better. But what?
One end is merely bent over and nailed to these boards:

And, the other end has this cryptic glued? connection:

I've never worked on drip irrigation before, so I picked up all sorts of 3/4" connections at the box stores:

At Home Depot, the guy told me that it's normal for the drip lines to simply push in, but this end seems to be really really stuck.
Another elbow nearby has a NPT-to-Hose fitting on the end:

Would you suggest I simply cut the elbow off and start fresh by putting a garden-hose connection on a T fitting?
Note: The plants are tomatoes, which are just now sprouting, so it has to be a gentle irrigation. I think a soaker hose may be too heavy - but I'm not sure what my options are.
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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 18:48:30 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Hmmm... they're under an oak tree (which bears acorns). And, they "look" like the same leaves. But, that's all I had to go by.

Having seen the majestic deeply lobate oaks of the east coast, I do understand the leaf does not look like your common eastern oaks ... but I still "think" it's an oak (due to the fact that the momma bears acorns - and I don't know any other tree that does that but an oak).
If it's not an oak, what is it?
Googling ... I see this Coast Live Oak: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_agrifolia
Or, maybe this Blue Oak: http://www.hastingsreserve.org/oakstory/TreeOaks.html
And, these common-to-California oaks: http://www.laspilitas.com/groups/oaks/california_oak1.html
And, even these native California oaks: http://www.stevenkharper.com/oakofcalifornia.html
Almost none of which have the classic East-Coast lobate leaf shape.
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Danny D. wrote:

I am assuming that you only have a modest garden and you are on domestic water mains.
The normal way of doing polypipe small scale irrigation is to have one fitting connecting the black poly to either a standard garden hose or an outside hose cock. From there everything is done in poly with push (bayonet fittings) unless larger than 25mm (1") when you use fittings with a nut. You run to your garden bed in 3/4" (19mm) or 1/2" (12mm) depending on the length of run and flow required. Generally you would run this down one side of the bed or both if it is wide. You then push either sprayers or drippers into that line.
The thin tubes (about 1/4", 6mm) you have are risers to allow the main line to be buried underground or under mulch, they are not really nesessary otherwise but can off course be used to take a dripper or sprayer away from the main pipe if you like. If using sprayers on the end of risers you can have a problem with keeping the jet at the right direction because the riser will bend and move all over the place unless fixed to a solid object. If you push your jets straight into the pipe you don't have that issue because it is more rigid. Drippers waste less water than sprayers but you need more of them as they don't have much spread. Especially in sandy soil the water from drippers goes down not outwards. It is usual to have a filter at the start of the system to reduce the incidence of blocked jets.
Some specifics about your setup:
- It is usual to terminate an end by folding it over and fastening it somehow (eg with wire), fancy fittings are not required, don't worry.
- With no scale I cannot tell for sure if you have 1/2" or 3/4", did you measure it?
- The junction between the white supply line and black poly is unusual, where the white tube first steps down it has been glued (the blue stuff is glue) I cannot tell about where the black goes into the green tube, if you cannot twist it at all or if you see a blue line round it then it has probably been glued too. The fact that it needed to be stepped down twice says to me either the underground pipe is much wider than required or you have 1/2" poly coming out instead of 3/4", or both.
- You seem to have this white tube buried in a number of places, is it all connected? To what? I don't know the retail prices where you are but here that kind of tube and the fittings for it are much more expensive than black poly and its fittings. I would be heading in the direction of doing most of what you need above ground in black poly. Except for garden forks and lawn mowers it is quite durable. I suspect you will not need very many of the box of fittings. Maybe you can get a refund.
- Sprayers or drippers will both be gentle enough for seedlings.
I cannot advise on the best refurbishment as I don't know how big your garden is or where the white supply line runs in relation to it. I suggest you stop buying stuff and sit down and plan what you want to do and then buy what you need. The manufacturers and vendors of black poly and fittings often have info and plans on the web. Here is one from a TV garden show:
http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/factsheets/Making-and-Mending/Do-It-Yourself-Irrigation/2194
David
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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 18:18:43 +1000, David Hare-Scott wrote:

The garden doesn't even qualify as modest.
It's about 10 feet long, by about 4 feet wide.
And, it's connected to well water, at a pressure of about 80 psi.
Even the tomato plants don't qualify as modest (yet):

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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 18:18:43 +1000, David Hare-Scott wrote:

Hi David,
I'm sorry. I should have provided more detail.
I just measured the plumbing.
1. The white PVC appears to be 1" in OD so I'd say it's 3/4" pipe.

2. The black plastic appears to be 3/4" in OD.

3. The "runners?" appear to be 1/4" or even less in OD.

Of course, now it's all gone, so, I'm actually at a *starting point* of this!

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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 17:50:41 -0700, Oren wrote:

I had not even thought of that, but it has the advantage that the drip lines would all radiate from the same point, so the water flow should be even, right?
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On Wed, 26 Jun 2013 06:36:40 -0700, Oren wrote:

Is this foxtail grass sprouting up all over my lawn?

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On Fri, 28 Jun 2013 08:23:33 -0700, Oren wrote:

Ah, I see. Similar, but probably different.
My "stuff" grows wild in balls dotted all over the place.

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On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 08:45:46 -0700, Oren wrote:

I think so. They have long tufts that eventually fall off. I don't bother removing them because they don't hurt anything.
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On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 16:01:21 -0700, Oren wrote:

Yikes. It was only about 95 or so here in the Silicon Valley, and *that* is blazing hot (for us)!
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On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 08:45:46 -0700, Oren wrote:

Here is a picture I snapped today of the grass that might be foxtail:
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3715/9187135154_4d512dbde4_c.jpg
There *are* "plumes" and the grass grows in clumps.
They're kind of blue, when well watered - but not when not. (My sprinklers are not fully working yet ... but I'm working on them as we speak.)
PS: Picturepush seems to now require registration, so, I'm trying flickr instead.
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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 17:39:07 -0700, Oren wrote:

I was wondering about that.
Why doesn't anyone just take a length of 3/4" PVC and drill a few holes in it?
Seems to me the cheapest and strongest method.
I guess the only downside is you need a drill press to make it efficient.
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On Wed, 26 Jun 2013 06:06:18 -0700, Oren wrote:

Ah. Thanks. I had never seen those before. My water is somewhat hard (I think it's 14 ppm Calcium.) Certainly the coffee pot gets that white film in just a week (removed with vinegar).
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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 18:18:43 +1000, David Hare-Scott wrote:

The garden has two duplicate rectangles of about 10 feet by 4 feet, both of which now have scattered tomato seed planted about a week ago.
It never rains here in California, at least until December or January, and the garden gets a good mix of sun and shade during the day, as it's overshadowed by some trees on the east but not on the south and west.
Each of the two plots has a single 3/4" elbow feeding it, one of which already has a NPT-to-GardenHose Thread male end on it. The other plot now has an open compression fitting to 3/4" poly hose (which needs to be plugged or replaced).
Both elbows are on the same irrigation zone, and there is a whoppingly huge 80psi of water pressure to deal with.
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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 18:18:43 +1000, David Hare-Scott wrote:

This sounds reasonable.
Part of the problem is that the wife took over my kitchen-compost spot, so now, she "owns" this garden (and she has forbidden me to enter it because she feels I end up ruining everything I touch).
At the moment, I've flooded her tomatoes, and, I've tried to save all the tiny 6-inch oaks which, in the end, infuriated her because that meant I ended up digging up more of her young tomatoes.
I've never done "drip" irrigation, so, I'm not sure what's the *right* way to irrigate her tomatoes (and present it as a surprise to her, all done and working).
I *think* my options are: a. Garden hose soaker b. Poly irrigation c. A sprinkler pop-up head
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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 18:08:59 -0700, Oren wrote:

She has threatened to lock the gate to the tomato garden!
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On Tue, 25 Jun 2013 23:02:10 +0000, Danny D. wrote:

Here are the oaks which will be replanted somewhere:
I've never re-planted an oak before, but what I plan on doing is picking a spot on the hillside where the roots and crown won't be bothersome - and seeing if they can grow on their own.
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Danny D. wrote:

For tomatoes I've always liked using these sprinklers because they are adjustable: http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/100138920?productId0138920&storeId051&langId=-1&catalogId053&PID09763&cm_mmc=CJ%2d%5f%2d1609763%2d%5f%2d10368321&SID=tfc%5f%2d%5f10%5f11%5f130626%5ffed98ed4c0733b80201369c68b97f30a%3a0000&AID368321&cj=true
or
http://tinyurl.com/p7nnrcr
It's attached to a 1/4 inch water tubing that is fed via the 1/2 inch main line tubing. The heads on it turn to allow more or less water to drip or sprinkle. I use one per bit planter, or 1 between 2 tomato plants.
--
Natural Girl //(*<*)\



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On 6/26/2013 11:29 AM, Natural - Smoking Gun - Girl wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/100138920?productId0138920&storeId051&langId=-1&catalogId053&PID09763&cm_mmc=CJ%2d%5f%2d1609763%2d%5f%2d10368321&SID=tfc%5f%2d%5f10%5f11%5f130626%5ffed98ed4c0733b80201369c68b97f30a%3a0000&AID368321&cj=true

Hey, you could kill vampires with one of those and wash the ashes away at the same time. ^_^
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

... and fertilize your tomatoes with the same ashes, too!
--
Natural Girl //(*<*)\



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