weeds already

Here in NJ. We were in Florida and when we came back, broadleaf weeds and dandelions have already started on the lawn so.... My original plan was to use Scotts + halts but I jumped right to Scotts Plus 2. Probably a mistake but I didn't want to wait another 6 weeks for the plus 2 application since weeds have already started. I remember years ago, my 1st application was always PLUS 2 and my lawn always looked great (no crabgrass either) Question is, does the plus 2 have any effect on crabgrass that hasn't germinated yet?
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Try reading the bag of poison and follow the directions
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Ignore idiotic posts like this one.

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There is something wrong with telling someone to read the bag and follow the directions?
--
Ann, Gardening in zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
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It's idiotic to read a bag of poison before using it? Wow.

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Do you reade the salt shaker before dumping it on your food? I doubt it.
opined:

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If you guys up there still have really cool temps, you might try some corn gluten as soon as possible to stem pre-emergent activity. Feed store or organic stores would probably have this. Apply once in late winter/early spring and in the fall. 20% vinegar with a spray applicator does well, too.
(I got into something really neat this year in the early spring with pre-emergent control - a propane torch, http://www.flameeng.com /. Works really well)
Some folks spread compost on their yards 1/2 to 3/4 inch in late winter/early spring and that helps prepare the lawn for full lush growth the following year and it helps chock out weeds. They also feed with an organice fertilzer and not synthetic ones.
Zone 9a.
NEWS wrote:

--

Celestial Habitats by J. Kolenovsky
2003 Honorable Mention Award, Keep Houston Beautiful
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J Kolenovsky wrote:

Not exactly a pre-emergent control. You have to have some leaves to burn. Unless you really toast the soil, the torch heat doesn't penetrate much soil. However, it's really a useful tool in the garden. And it appeals to male gardeners a lot.
I use one for growing carrots. I make a seedbed, water it and let the weeds start growing. When they're 1/2 to 1" high, I burn them. You don't have to really toast the plants: that wastes fuel. All that is necessary is to raise the temperature of the leaf surface sufficiently to boil the fluids, breaking the cell walls. The leaf then dies and takes the plant with it. With the Flame Engineering Red Dragon torch, walking down the row at a moderate saunter is enough. The range of the torch is less than a foot across the bed and less than 1/8 inch into the soil. If the weeds are more than 2" high you have to toast them more. Get them early.
Back to carrots: after about 2 weeks killing weeds I have a stale seedbed (the weed seeds near the surface have germinated and I have killed them so there are not many more weeds that are going to grow.) I then plant carrot seed, about 1/2 inch deep, trying to minimize soil disturbance (which brings up more weed seeds). After about 5 days I torch whatever's up. On the 6th day the carrots are up and the bed is fairly weed free. I have noticed carrots emerging as early as 6 hours after the last flaming, but usually my timing is not that good. Since the carrots have to have germinated by that last flaming I infer that the torch does not reach significantly below the surface, otherwise I would have toasted my carrots.
If you try to do this take note: it works poorly in the spring since weed seeds germinate at different times and many wait until late spring or early summer so you won't have toasted them with the torch. Best time to use it is late spring or later. It also works poorly on grasses, since the growing point is underground and the torch doesn't kill it. Works great on broadleafed weeds. Note further that you really have to water the weeds to get them to germinate so you can kill them. If you don't do this you don't get control. It's really tricky to use the torch when there's a crop in place. Expect to lose some of the crop if you try this. A small pebble can disturb the flame enough to throw heat back onto the crop and damage it.
You used to be able to get 6 lb propane cylinders before they came out with the consumer-proof devices they now have added to the tanks. They were much easier to put on a backpack for garden work. Haven't seen them recently.
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