Watering with soft water

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Yes, it is a two step process.

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Billy wrote:

. . I don't know about the chemical equation there, but I do know that my home inspector told me the same thing about making sure there was a valve on the outside spigots to prevent backflow for that very reason... also good for keeping fertilizers and the like out of your pipes.
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H2SO4 is sulfuric acid. H2S + 2CO2 -> H2SO4 + C2 doesn't make any sense.
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Billy

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wrote:

I think the CO2 was incidental to the discussion. There may be some biological reactions where bacteria are removing the carbon from the CO2, releasing oxygen, which then combines with the H2S, but that's getting a bit far afield here. More frequently the bacteria remove the oxygen from the sulfate, use it to metabolize some organic compounds and release the CO2 from that metabolism.
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wrote:

Sulfur dioxide and water combine to form sulfurous acid, H2SO3. This slowly oxidizes to form sulfuric acid, H2SO4. Sulfur dioxide can also oxidize to sulfur trioxide, which will then combine with water to form sulfuric acid.
Sulfate reducing bacteria can remove the oxygen from the acid.
H2SO4 -> H2S + 2O2
The H2SO4 while in water will be ionized and may be associated with other cations, calcium, magnesium, the like. So the above description is only a rough description of what is going on.
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Flange head, we were talking about hydrogen sulfide, not sulfur dioxide. You're an idiot. If you don't know the difference between sulfide and sulfite, then don't respond to the question. H2S vs. SO2 (rotten eggs vs. brimstone). What an imbecile. Idiot. Moron. Get my drift?

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wrote:

No, I don't.
I started talking about sulfur dioxide because it was appropriate to what I had to say. Not too complicated, is it?
What I was getting to was the H2S and the CO2 combination, CO2 drifted into the thread some time ago.

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Appropriate to what you had to say? How do you get from sulfides to sulfites? Why don't you just start singing Ave Maria, it has about as much to do with the conversation as sulfites. It certainly isn't complicated to realize that you are cretin. And here you are trying to rationalize your bullshit? You seem to be a waste of time and space.

In your ear, when? They are both volatile and leave solution as gases.

In some other universe. We were talking about sulfides, H2S.
God, you are slow. OK. If you are 12 years old or younger, I forgive you. If you are older, you have a lot of nerve wasting my time.
On other news fronts, the smoked spareribs were wonderful and and a big hit. We are best buds with the family pets again:-)
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Billy

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Billy, stop being abusive.
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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

Abusive? Moi?
Anyway, somewhere way back in time, I vaguely remember that we were talking about H2S (sulfide) and then some (supply your own pejorative here) introduced SO2 (sulfite) into the conversation. By the way, under anarobic conditions sulfer will be reduced to sulfide.
Secondly, I don't tell you how to post, so back off.
Now you can continue on with the flavor of the day, RADON?.
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Billy

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That chemical reaction is no where in my message.
H2S is a byproduct of anaerobic digestion of organic material, and goes into water as hydrogen sulfide. "hydrogen sulfide is weakly acidic, dissociating in aqueous solution into hydrogen cations H+ and the hydrosulfide anion HS-: H2S ? HS- + H+ Ka = 1.310-7 mol/L; pKa = 6.89"
"In the management of water-supply wells, iron bacteria are bacteria that derive the energy they need to live and multiply by oxidizing dissolved ferrous iron (or the less frequently available manganese and aluminium). .....The proliferation of iron bacteria, in some way, increases the chance of sulfur bacteria infestation.
Common effects of excess iron in water are a reddish-brown color, stained laundry and poor tasting coffee. An equally common but less well understood problem is infestation of water supplies with iron bacteria. Iron bacteria are a natural part of the environment in most parts of the world. These microorganisms combine dissolved iron or manganese with oxygen and use it to form rust-colored deposits. In the process, the bacteria produce a brown slime that builds up on well screens, pipes, and plumbing fixtures.
Tastes and Odors - Iron bacteria often produce unpleasant tastes and odors commonly reported as: "swampy," "oily or petroleum," "cucumber," "sewage," "rotten vegetation," or "musty." The taste or odor may be more noticeable after the water has not been used for some time. Iron bacteria do not produce hydrogen sulfide, the "rotten egg" smell, but do create an environment where sulfur bacteria can grow and produce hydrogen sulfide."
"The purple sulfur bacteria are a group of Proteobacteria capable of photosynthesis, collectively referred to as purple bacteria. They are anaerobic or microaerophilic, and are often found in hot springs or stagnant water. Unlike plants , algae, and cyanobacteria, they do not use water as their reducing agent, and so do not produce oxygen. Instead they use hydrogen sulfide, which is oxidized to produce granules of elemental sulfur. This in turn may be oxidized to form sulfuric acid." These bacteria are often sold to people to reduce the sludge in ponds and sewage systems.
CO2 goes into water to make H2CO3, carbonic acid.
Under pressure both are in solution like in a well. When pumped out of the well and pressure is released, the gases come out of solution.
The simple test for both is pump out a 5 gallon bucket of water, take a pH test. aerate and after 24 hours test pH again. If the pH rises then the gases have come out of solution. If it is H2S, that can be smelled in very small amounts.
See, just cant spontaneously combine chemical reactions. Ingrid

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The only fixture I've noticed red tint is in the toilet bowl if I let it go without cleaning long enough. A ring a the surface level in the toilet about a 1/2" wide. None on the sediment filter bowl, or, the carbon filter in place for 3 months at a time.
Yet, the obvious level of hydrogen sulfide gas at the well is very high due to its odor level. The level of gas not only varies with lack of water usage, but also, with locally heavy rains.
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Dave

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Appreciate your input. I've done alot of homework regarding the anaerobic bacteria that produce such gas, their typical habitats, and so forth. There are pockets of water that are referred to as wells that have suitable habitat for these bacteria, just as a peat bottomed pond does. These reside there whether a well is drilled or not.
A one-way check valve at the bib can serve the same purpose you speak of. Even though it wasn't designed for that in mind.
Nevertheless, the hydrogen sulfide gas originates from the well since day 1 it was tapped.
There are many considerations for "shocking" a well. That includes my neighbors that may sharing the same water who may pump bleach, and drink it. I prefer to deal with it as it is for my purposes without treatment for irrigation.
The aerator in my filtration system forces air into the water while in a storage bottle. This changes into sulfuric acid and sinks to the bottom of the bottle. Every 24 hours, its mixed with incoming water and flushed to a french drain automatically. The live oaks in the vicinity, and St. Augustine grass above the french drain don't seem to mind it. The way I look at it the acidity of the watered down sulfuric acid and the alkalinity of the limestone rock and caliche native to the local area are doing something good in the mix.
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Dave

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On Tue, 4 Mar 2008 23:13:52 -0600, "Dioclese" <NONE> wrote:

"But evil is still evil In anybody's name" ~~ Don Henley "If Dirt Were Dollars"
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Nice to have you back Professor:-)
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Billy

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Here now, Mr. Billy! You shouldn't be a temptin' this here old pig-ignorant autodidactic to return to his former estate. During my winter sabbatical, I purposed to return, if indeed I *did* return, a more gentle and tolerant Charlie. All that banging on pots left me sorely afflicted with tinnitis.....or was that the atenolol....hmmm.
*sigh*.....life is difficult, isn't it?
Charlie
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of battle." (I forgot who I stole this from...Amos Nomore perhaps)
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wrote:

I presume you are referring to chlorine being added to the well water. This is done by most water districts to avoid people becoming sick from drinking water with enteric (caca) bacteria in it. Locally, wells connected to household water are checked for bacteria and those that are high are shut down.

??? Hydrogen sulfide can turn into an extremely weak acid. H2S ---> HS- + H+ Ka = 1.3~10-7 mol/L; pKa = 6.89.
Sulfuric (or sulfurous) acid, if it was present, would stay in solution (homogeneously).

2 Fe + 3 S + 3 H2O ---> Fe2O3 + 3 (H2S)?
H2S often results from the bacterial break down of organic matter in the absence of oxygen, such as in swamps and sewers (anaerobic digestion).

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Billy

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