Watering with soft water

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Well I am not confusing anything. salt is NaCl which dissociates in water to Na+ and Cl-. Cl-, BTW is what makes food taste "salty". The sodium ions are exchanged for the calcium and magnesium ions in the water which are stabilized with the chloride ions which are flushed down the drain. The sodium stays in the softened water. This is a BIG issue with people who keep fish because some places have so much calcium and/or magnesium in their water that the sodium ion concentration is thus high enough to sicken and/or kill their fish. This is even a bigger problem when people use salt prophylactically without testing for sodium ion concentration. It is the chloride ions that are helpful to fish, not the sodium.
In addition physicians typically admonish their patients with high blood pressure to not drink softened water, rather, to use RO water for drinking. Ingrid

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Sheldon wrote:
.

Now you've done it!! Why did you have to post FACTS?? ;-) Tom J
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what he said.... absolutely. not to mention is very expensive to use soft water.

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On Sun, 02 Mar 2008 07:34:46 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

through a softening process can be expensive. I pump very soft water out of the ground, costs but a little electricity.
John

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Don't pay any attention to John, Shelly. Have another big glass of your soft water.
John, we are trying to cull the herd here. Your good sense is just going to confuse him.
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Billy

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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

What do you call "very expensive"?
A 40 pound bag of salt will typically produce about 6,000 gallons of softened water... a 40 pound bag of salt costs about $4.50.
Actually that same $4.50 worth of salt can save the average household about $45 worth of cleaning products each month... not to mention the time and effort of cleaning, and will save more than 6,000 gallons of water each month (mostly hot water) because softened water is just that much more efficient at cleaning. Softened water is kind to your plumbing too, will save untold thousands in plumbing bills over the life of the water softener (about 20 years).
If one lives in a hard water locale *not* having a water softener is VERY expensive.
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In article

This was about gardening Shelly, not plumbing. Toxification of the landscape and all that. St. Molly used to say, when you find yourself in a hole, stop digging.
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there is a lot of water needed to backwash the resin (if paying for the water) plus the electricity. then there are the iron prefilters to replace. on my mothers house the water is very hard and she used a service, rented the equipment, somebody carried the bags down into the basement and filled the softener. $45 every 3 months. She had extensive gardens and I can see that it could have doubled the price if she didnt have well water for the gardens. this doesnt even include the price she paid for city water which I am not even sure how much that costs cause the renters pay for that now. We dont have a softener. During 3 months we use about 12-15 ccf in winter, about 30 or more ccf in summer. 30.0 ccf = $164.89. Remember that sewage fees are based on USAGE it doesnt matter if that water for the garden doesnt go down the drain. Well water costs nothing but the electricity to pump it and the pump replaced every 25 years or so. Ingrid

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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

Soft water is good for the bathtub/shower, laundry, and the dishwasher. For drinking, hard water is probably better (mineral water).
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wrote:

I think it depends on how hard it is and what else is in it. Out city water tastes bad to me, it is very hard. It's no doubt better on a health basis, except when it is so offensive that I don't drink it.
I use an RO filter for drinking water.
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Billy wrote:

I've never been a fan of soft water for bathing or hand washing. I never actually feel like all the soap has been rinsed off of me... almost a slightly slimy or oily residue is left on my skin. Its one of the things I dread when I go to Florida or Vegas and stay at a hotel.
My girlfriend's condo complex is all softened water, and I hate showering there. Of course, Germantown has some terrible ground water with a high iron/sulfer content, so the softener might not be completely to blame...
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yeah... the Milwaukee area has some hellatious calcium/magnesium in the water... of course that is why NE there are all those limestone quarries!!!!
the amount of softening that must be done to our water results in not very tasty water, I agree. I used to like the taste of hard water until the iron bacteria got into the well.
If you had long hair you would fall in love with it. We had a softener all my life but when I left home and lived elsewhere with hard water I couldnt believe how "gummy" my hair felt all the time. When I came back home my hair went back to feeling clean and soft. Now lake water comes out of the tap and it is pretty soft.
What bothers me most about the Milwaukee area well water is the radon levels. and nobody is talking about the fact that heating the water does not blow off the radon and long hot showers breathing that in cant be very good for anyone.
wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

. I'm happy with the city water drawn from the lake. It really is some of the best-tasting water right out of the tap. Of course, as you said, a lot of calcium.

. I HAVE heard similar experiences from others with long hair. I'll have to take your (and their) word on it! I stand by my assertion that my skin feels unrinsed after washing with soft water. :)

Don't get me started on radon... :) When I was doing research before buying my home, all the source articles (even directly from the EPA) basically say "If you're a smoker, high concentrations of radon might slightly increase your risk for lung cancer."
To me, the only reason to worry about radon (unless we're talking uranium mine-type concentrations!) is because the person who wants to buy your house might be worried about it.
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Similar question here. How about hydrogen sulfide gas from well water. Its filtered out before entering home plumbing. Hose bibs are connected to the same home plumbing.
Normally, I use the 2 standalone faucets outside for irrigation. These have no filtration whatsoever. Any special notes on soaker hoses for this situation?
--
Dave



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"Dioclese" <NONE> wrote
Any special notes on soaker hoses for this

Not sure about where you live, but here, the irrigation water is not filtered to a high degree. Fill a glass gallon jug and see if it has sediment or organic materials. This will clog up a soaker from the inside.
Steve
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Central TX, rural hill country west of IH35.
Do have calcium etc from limestone in well water. Not really concerned about that since the soil is similar due to runoff from rain. I have a sediment filter, hydrogen gas filtration bottle (aerator), and a whole-house carbon filter running inline to the house.
I saw one of those "what ifs" on an educational channel on TV. Evidently, the earth ODed on hydrogen sulfide gas sometime in the past. Killed pretty much everything land and sea. There's potential for that to happen again. The gas is bad ju-ju in concentrations. Thus, the soaker hose question about water with hydrogen sulfide gas. Picture in my mind about a soaker hose is like a holding tank, intermittently burping pure hydrogen sulfide gas in concentration.
--
Dave



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wrote:

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa006&colID=1&articleID 037A5D- A938-150E-A93883414B7F0000
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hydrogen sulfide is created by bacteria. in water it goes into solution as H2SO4, sulfuric acid. of course, in a well both H2S and CO2 are under pressure and when they are pumped out they de-gas. In the burbs outside Milwaukee well water can get contaminated by the bacteria if there isnt a valve on the outside hoses to prevent back flushing of soil (with bacteria) into the tank and then into the well. or, if the well casing starts to break down letting soil into the well. IIRC the bacteria feed off the iron in the water releasing the H2S. Anyway. the wells often need to be cleaned by dumping bleach down in there and then flushed to get rid of the bacteria. there is probably more H2S in the bottom of a typical pond than in well water. soaker hoses dont stand up long to well water unless there are very good filters on them. personal experience. Ingrid
On Mon, 3 Mar 2008 07:27:57 -0600, "Dioclese" <NONE> wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

H2S + 2CO2 -> H2SO4 + C2 doesn't make any sense. Makes all other statements questionable.
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wrote:

The H2S in the well most likely comes from sulfate reducing bacteria acting on sulfates that are already in the water.
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