Watering tomato plants w/sea water

Interesting article from Science Daily.
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WATERING TOMATO PLANTS WITH DILUTED SEAWATER BOOSTS LEVELS OF ANTIOXIDANTS Watering tomatoes with diluted seawater can boost their content of disease-fighting antioxidants and may lead to healthier salads, appetizers, and other tomato-based foods, scientists report. Besides their use in a variety of ethnic food dishes, tomatoes are one of the most commonly grown home garden vegetables, particularly cherry tomatoes. Scientists have linked tomatoes to several health benefits, including protection against prostate cancer and heart disease. Researchers have known for years that seawater does not stimulate the growth of tomatoes, but scientists know little about its effects on the nutritional content of the vegetables. -- full story > http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080428092116.htm
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Since I live not too far from the beach, am considering a test, once my tomato plants are up and flourishing (ojala!). * Water one group normally, and water a control group of the same variety -- isolated far enough not to absorb the "normal" water -- with the suggested 12% dilute sea water.
Like many of my hot flashes, this one may not last, but I AM intrigued!
* I may commit the heretical act of *buying* cherry tomato plants to get this experiment under way more quickly. Also would allow me to isolate the plants and their control group more effectively -- if I can find the room.
Stay tuned! <g>
Persephone
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Please keep us informed. Only plants about here with high salt tolerance is Rosa Rugosa. But not having salt nearby I am ignorant. I read sew weed is a good addition to the pile.
Bill 40 miles from the ocean.
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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Salt is what killed the "Fertile Crescent". Unless you have sandy soil you may want to worry about salt build-up, which could affect the fertility of your garden. This experiment may work but I would have the amount of salt in your soil analyzed befor you start your experiment. If the quantity of salt in your soil rises 12%, you can stop adding saltwater. This would raise the question of what salts are causing the increase in nutrients. It may not be the Na+, Cl- but some combination of Cl-, Na+, Mg2+, SO42-, Ca2+, K+, C, Br-, B, Sr2+, F-. The rough composition of sea salts is known however there is more dissolved salt in the Atlantic than the Pacific.
Let us know how it works out.
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Billy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KVTfcAyYGg&ref=patrick.net

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