Wasp Spray Dangers in the Veggies?

Several weeks ago I was getting the veggie garden ready and hit a large colony of ants. I know that ants are *supposed* to be harmless, but... last year the mound some ants dug hammered several of my golden pepper bell plants. Without thinking long enough, I reached into my shed and grabbed the first thing I could see which was wasp spray and saturated a 4'x4' area.
It has rained quite a bit since (SW PA zone 5b or 6ish) and now I'm wandering if there is any significant problem with putting bush beans or bush cukes in that little sector?
I'm sure some will flame this... have at it... but I'm really looking for any definitive answers, so I'll just have to ignore a few of those to get to the useful stuff, I suppose.
thanks
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Ralph D. wrote:

Wasp sprays are generally synthetic pyrethroids (sp?), which is pretty safe. (you should read the label and see what the active ingredient is, though.) If you're really worried about it, just don't plant peanuts or onions or potatoes or other root crops there. Your bean or cuke vines should not to take up much (if any) fast-decaying insecticides. And you shouldn't have to deal with cutworms getting your beans.
-Bob
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wrote:
:) Several weeks ago I was getting the veggie garden ready and hit a large :) colony of ants. I know that ants are *supposed* to be harmless, but... last :) year the mound some ants dug hammered several of my golden pepper bell :) plants. Without thinking long enough, I reached into my shed and grabbed the :) first thing I could see which was wasp spray and saturated a 4'x4' area. :) :) It has rained quite a bit since (SW PA zone 5b or 6ish) and now I'm :) wandering if there is any significant problem with putting bush beans or :) bush cukes in that little sector? I don't think your worry would be the amount of insecticide around the plants, but if the by products in the aerosol will effect the growth of the plants. If the can says water based formula, even that wouldn't be a worry. Another option would be removing several inches deep of the area and bring in some fresh soil.
Lar. (to e-mail, get rid of the BUGS!!
It is said that the early bird gets the worm, but it is the second mouse that gets the cheese.
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Pull out the bottle, look for the manufacturer's 800 number, and call it. They can tell you how persistant whatever it was you sprayed is.
And next time *read* and *follow* label instructions. There are reasons they're printed. You've just discovered one of 'em.
Kay
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wrote:

There's usually a lot written about a pesticide product and this should state something about use around edible plants. I'm sure some pesticides should not come in contact with edibles. To be on the safe side you could plant non-edibles (annual flowers) in that particular area until next year. Wear gloves when planting.
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