vegetables recommended by chefs

Article in today's fish wrap (a.k.a. Press Democrat) gave preferences for vegetables grown by local chefs (Sonoma County, region 9 - 10.) To see full article go to http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20090320/LIFESTYLE/903180138/1309/LI FESTYLE?Title=Growing-flavor-in-Sonoma-County .
Among preferred veggies are:
ŒJimmy Nardello¹ Pepper: An Italian frying pepper, it was long out of vogue compared to other varieties. But Mall (chef) said this sweet pepper is ³amazing² when cooked slowly in extra virgin olive oil with sea salt and a touch of garlic. ³When we sell our stuff at the farmer¹s market, it¹s one that other chefs love to buy.² Mall likes to cook it for use as a condiment, pizza topping or on bruschetta.
ŒMoon Star¹ Watermelon: Many flavorful varieties can also be knock-outs. This one looks like the night sky. ³It has one big orange spot that is the moon and a lot of little ones that are stars,² says Mall. ³It¹s bizarre looking and has a lot of seeds, but people from the south have told me it¹s the best they¹ve had outside Georgia.²
ŒFairy Tale¹ Eggplant: These small wonders come in neon shades of purple and are striking. they retain their color even when cooked. ŒPaul Robeson¹ Tomato: Like other dark tomatoes, this one has a rich, sweet, concentrated taste. The Malls entered this one in a tomato tasting at the Windsor Farmer¹s Market last summer and all the growers declared it the best.
ŒZephyr¹ Squash: Long, slender and shaped a bit like a bowling pin, it has a nice ³firm texture² and sweet taste. Mallgren prefers the texture to common zucchini. ³It has a nice bite and a nice crunch to it,² he says.
ŒIsar¹ Gold French Bean: Mallgren says this variety has a clean flavor and is tender. And while it resembles a green bean, this filet bean is really a yellow variety.
ŒTavera¹ Green Bean: Mallgren is partial to these because of their flavor and texture. They¹re not too tough. And the best part is they¹re reliable. They come out of the garden consistently good.
ŒBulls Blood¹ Beets: With deep, metallic purple leaves, this variety is heat resistant and you can eat the whole thing. Blacktail Mountain Watermelon: This heirloom variety is super sweet with a relatively thin pith. The flesh is deep red and the outside almost black.
Calabrese Pepper: Long, thin and deep red, this Italian chili pepper has a little heat and great flavor.
ŒHillbilly¹ Tomato: This large slicing tomato is great for gazpacho. The result is so creamy it almost ³melts in the mouth² like mozzarella de bufalo, Gerbi says.
ŒBrandywine¹ Tomato: It may not be rare but it¹s a sure-fire winner, according to Gerbi, and comes in late in the season. It¹s easy to slice and has a nice balanced flavor for sweetness and acidity.
Tres Fin Marchiere Frissee Endive: A French endive, it is very thin, soft and cool. It grows well in Sonoma County all year because it¹s resistant to frost and insects.
--

The online resources that were given are familiar to most of us:

Johnny¹s Selected Seeds: Based in Maine, this employee-owned company
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

We've been doing Nardello's for six years and they are as good as they sound. I'd add Golden Marconi to this also...excellant sauteed and great raw. Large plants, large oblong fruit and very prolific.

One of the local growers had these last year and besides being beautiful, they are delicious.

Yep....good choice for beets.

We had these last year and I second the great taste. If you are saving seed, don't plant too close to Brandywine, or any other potato-leaf variety.

What can ya' say. Brandywine is hands down favorite for flavor and late season is true...plant other varieties for earlier 'maters, but when they start coming on, be ready for lots of them.

I'd like to add my favorite to this list, though I sometimes wonder why I encourage a bigger buying load on them....rareseeds.com....Oz will vouch for them also.

I'm getting away from the small-celled germ trays, (and getting away from starting some things period) and starting peppers and maters in four to six inch pots, and starting them only four weeks before last frot date, my thinking being, their root structure doesn't become hindered before setting them out. Last year I started all my tomatoes in flats and pricked them out into four inch pots when they hit two true leaves and they exploded in growth and didn't seem to slow down when transplanted.
I've gotten seed-starting things out and pulled seeds from the freezer and am in process of making the "final" decisions on how much to over-start....as usual. Younger son is gardening this year, so I've much more to start....he's a novice and didn't ever pay much attention, except to his plate, but he, and DIL, are both enthused and ready to go...just need a little direction and help. His location is likely to be the best of the three of ours. Looking at roughly 1200 sq. ft. with full sun all day, plus a separate asparagus bed of however big he wants. Elder son has roughly the same amount of garden in raised beds with about 4/5 day full sun.
We've planted six fruit trees at each of their places and I have four going here at The Home and have decided to plant at least three more this year.
Charlie
"The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now." -- African proverb, or Chinese, or who knows whose
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hmmm. Not only am I using the small cells, but when I get multiple germinations, which is my norm, I separate and replant them. This is especially gratifying to me, when I do it with over-priced "starts" ($3.49/6) from the nursery. I'll let you know how it works out.

(Sigh) I'm lookin' at a half-a-dozen patches that amount to about 400 sq. ft. and a 1/2 day of Sun at the best.

Summer shade and healty food, not a bad deal.

--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being is
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.