Various Tomato Problems

As I've acknowledged in previous posts, I'm pretty much a novice at gardening, so all help is appreciated.
I live in Zone 4, where in June we had next to no rain, but high humidity.
Up until this week I thought my tomato plants were all thriving, but now I'm having problems with two or three varieties (I planted a dozen different kinds -- so far the others still look good, with lots of fruit on each.)
The leaves on my brandywine tomatoes have looked excessively curled pretty much since Day One, but the plants have always kept growing and are now putting out flowers. (I planted the brandywines near last.) Now, however, many of the leaves have started to look either chewed upon or in various stages of disintegration, especially where they're touched by the metal support cages. Are there bugs/blight/viruses/fungi that prefer brandywine leaves exclusively, but no other kind? Could the metal (galvanized tin?) be contributing to or accelerating leaf morbidity? So far I haven't lost an entire plant yet and the top thirds of them still look healthy.
On one whole branch of my yellow plum tomatoes, the bottom of each fruit has a big brown/black mushy spot. The branch in question is mostly in the shade, and so far none of my other yellow plums (many are close to eating stage) have been affected. Not knowing what to do I've picked and discarded the spotted tomatoes. Is there anything else I should/can do?
Some of my cherry tomato plants are experiencing a lot of yellowing leaves. Is this most likely due to excessive watering?
How do you know when green zebras are ready to eat?
Once again thanks for any help.
viv
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I can only answer, or attempt to answer, a couple of these questions. I too am growing Brandywine too, as well as Better Boys and Big Beefs. Since your leaves are curling during the day, I suspect it is due to loss of water. Try mulching the plants for more consistent water retention. I use grass clippings which work very well for me.
The black mushy spots on the bottom of your tomatoes are due to a calcium deficiency and is known as blossom end rot. You can apply some dolomitic lime which has calcium in it. Unfortunately, it will take several months to be absorbed into the plant.
Garwood
vivian wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.