Unusual idea. unusual request.

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At various times in years past our kids made themselves a golfcourse, football pitch, croquet lawn, badminton court and a swing-ball stance, all on less than 4 acres. A child-propelled push-mower played a major part in turning rough hill grazing into lawn. We encouraged their interest in sports turf maintenance as much as possible, even going so far as to save dogfood tins which they sunk in the grass as putt-holes, and helping them find golfclubs in jumble sales. You'd be surprised how many of our adult friends spent hours playing in our garden.
Go for it; you don't need to look for golfcourse standards, you can work the drives and greens around plantations of trees and shrubs etc, and you and your friends will have a lot of fun.
Janet. (Scotland)
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On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 17:19:27 GMT, Janet Baraclough ..

What a good idea. I hadn't looked at it from that angle, but giving the project over to kids, particularly the maintenance, sounds terrific. And interesting.
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Golf greens are high maintenance. Bentgrass and bermudagrass are the two most popular grasses used. Which you use is dependant on the zone you live in. Bentgrass is a cool season grass that stays green all year, but if temperatures reach 85 degrees you must syringe (spray with water) the green 3 or more times in a day to keep it alive. Bentgrass is used as far south as Pinehurst, NC (zone 7b). At the Pinehurst golf courses they use huge fans for air circulation on certain greens and syringe all greens throught the summer months. By August the root system is so shallow that they have to use liquid fertalizer just to provide enough nutriant to get to the next cool season. Bermudagrass(hybrid is best) is a warm season grass that will grow as far north as zone 7a. It goes dormant in the winter and must be overseeded with rye. It is extremely heat tolerant(less watering) and durable but poor in shade. Both bent and bermuda must be cut with a real mower at least 4 times a weak to prevent burning of the foliage. If you really want to get fancy excavate soil and replace with 85% peat 15% sand(PGA specs). I strongly advice against a golf green.
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barrett wrote:

Not true. Not even half true by any stretch of the imagination.

PGA has no specs for golf greens. USGA, however, recommends 85% SAND and 15% PEAT, but it only meets specs if it has a perched water table.
You were kinda making sense until you got to the end.
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Whats not true or half true by any strecth of the imagination? Golf greens are cut to a height of one eighth of an inch( give or take a fraction or two). If you know of a rotory lawnmower that will cut that short i'd like to know about it. If you cut more than one third of length off a blade of grass you can get burning(browning)of the leaves. In college we maintained a hybrid bermuda lawn. We mowed 3 times a week and almost allways burned the foliage. Don't know about the PGA/USGA part, but if your right I guess that makes me only half wrong about it. You can get around the perk part with a drainage system under the green(there are specs for that too).
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (barrett) wrote:

Maybe you meant REEL mower 4 times a WEEK. That is what golf courses here do.
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