Turkey's rare orchids

x0x Turkey's rare orchids
By Onder Erdem
The delicate beauty of orchids fires enthusiasts, and as one of the largest families of flowering plants in the world, searching out its vast number of species is an endless journey of discovery and delight.
The orchid comes in many strange and lovely forms, particularly in the tropics where it is widespread, and varies greatly in size and appearance in different climatic regions. Both the beauty and long life of cut orchids makes this family of flowers the favourite of florists throughout the world, and for many tropical countries orchids are a major source of income.
Although the diversity of species diminishes as you move away from the tropics, this is only relative, and the orchid enthusiast can still find many species in more temperate climes. No less than 148 different orchid species grow in Turkey, for instance, and 40 of these are endemic, that is found in Turkey alone. Turkey is home to almost as many orchid species as grow in the entire European continent, and has more endemic species than any other country in the region. In terms of its flora Turkey has been likened to a continent in its own right.
Altogether there are 12,000 known species of plants in Europe, while Turkey alone has approximately three-quarters of this number, of which 3000 are endemic, accentuating the importance of the coutry'sn biodiversity.
Most orchids flower in spring, so although it is possible to find blooming orchids at any season in Turkey, in the spring months the hills and mountains are brightly carpeted with orchids of all colours and sizes. They grow in such varied habitats that it is possible to find orchids on the alpine meadows of the Kackar Mountains, in the Black Sea region, in the maquis scrub of the Aegean, and in the pine forests high in the Taurus Mountains along the Mediterranean coast.
But of all the places in Turkey where orchids are to be found, it is the southwestern province of Mugla which is home to the most species, at nearly seventy. In March and April at least five or six orchid species bloom on coastal meadowland, and if you return to the same meadows a couple of weeks later you will find their place taken by five or six different species.
Those to whom the word orchid conjures up an image of the exotic species sold in florists may not immediately recognise orchids when they come across them while wandering in the Turkish countryside. Less flamboyant and extravagant in size than their tropical cousins they might be, but equally exquisite when examined at close quarters. The tiny purple flowers of the green-winged orchid (Orchis morio), for instance, are captivating. As you walk along be on the lookout, too, for the spiralling flower spike of lady's tresses (Spiranthes spiralis), a frail plant seldom more than 10 cm tall, its small flowers like dancing butterflies. These miniature flowered orchids open the door into the magical world of Turkish orchids.
At the other end of the spectrum are such large and striking species as the giant orchids of the genus Himantoglossum which grow to 50 cm in height, and Anacamptis pyramidalis with over thirty flowers on each stem. The Anatolian orchid (Orchis anatolica), a species named after Anatolia, again has all the beauty of a butterfly in flight. Of them all the most intriguing are the members of the bee orchid genus Ophrys, characterised by flowers with an uncanny resemblance to bees or other insects. This deception attracts bees and insects to the flowers as colour and scent do to other flowers, illustrating the devious ways of nature in ensuring the propagation of living things.
* Onder Erdem is a photographer
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A link to a site with pictures would be interesting
--
David Hill
Abacus nurseries
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David Hill wrote:

Here is a link that I found navigating the web.
http://www.geocities.com/anatoliannativeorchids /
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So the review is wrong.
There are on the website 148 photographs of 68 species of orchids in 18 genera NOT 148 species!!!
TRH gets a failing grade!!!

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wrote:

I corresponded with the author of the article. He suggested to see http://www.summerfieldbooks.com/catalogue/item152.htm for more.
Ahmet Toprak TRH
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Well isn't that special?
148 different Turkish orchids that cannot be grown in gardens.
How relevant is that to a gardening newsgroup?
Are you expecting to get extra credit for posting your book review on-line?

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Plants in other parts of the world are always interesting. Why it bothers you to read about them is another question.
--
Ann, Gardening in zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
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It doesn't bother me, Ann. Does that bother you? It seems all you grow in Beantown is annoyed!!! Did you "pahk yah kah in Hahvad yad" again and get a ticket?
Someone posting a book review about plants one cannot grow in the garden in a gardening newsgroup just seems to be pointless.
If he was trying to drum up publicity to sell the book, the dude forgot to include a link to a website with info on how to buy it.
expounded:

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Cereus-validus wrote:

It seems to be *bothering* you, big time. :) If the country were Greece or Armenia, It wouldn't shake you so much, right? Right!
Under special circumstances, perhaps, some of them could be grown in a garden. We wouldn't know, unless we try it.
It seems the 'dude' is a photographer and 'published' his pictures on a web page.
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Wrong. TRH is a dude. Triton is a dude.
Onder Erdem is the photographer who spent all the time and effort traveling across Turkey and photographing the plants. His big mistake was his posting his pix on the internet and not in a book.
What have you done, dude?
Beware of Greeks bearing other people's gifts.
Under "special circumstances, perhaps, some of them could be grown" on Mars too!!! What's your point?

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Cereus-validus wrote:

I can't speak for TRH.

Mistake? Perhaps the 'dude' couldn't find a publisher?

Wrong! The common English expression is ?beware of Greeks bearing gifts? Trojan Horse situation that is.

My point is I wouldn't know. It seems you do. I'll let it go like that.
,,,
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I am the one who posted the article on behalf of the San Francisco Turkish Radio, but I am not the author.
I think the author of the article is simply interested in photography. I corresponded with the him. He said that there is a very comprehensive book already on the topic: http://www.summerfieldbooks.com/catalogue/item152.htm .
Ahmet Toprak

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Oh?
Perhaps the Orchis species mentioned? Orchis is a good genera to grow in the garden. I'm sure there are others that can be grown in gardens... the question is where to get them, very few companies in the U.S. sell temperate orchids.

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Turns out that number is wrong. There are on the website 148 photographs of 68 species of orchids in 18 genera NOT 148 species!!!
***************
You are not sure. You are only speculating.
What do you think the chances are that the endemic species, especially the rare ones, are protected and unavailable?

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If we knew for sure, it sould be less interesting. Isn't a lot of the point of this newsgroup to speculate on gardening questions?

Unfortunately, that's not as likely as it should be. A lot of orchids that should be protected aren't.
Though the chances of obtaining seed for tissue culture and eventually growing in a garden are quite high. And if anyone on the list is in Europe, their are a number of sources there for terrestrial hardy orchids, possibly including some from Turkey (and definitely including some closely related species). I believe the article mentioned an Orchis species, Orchis is supposed to be one of the best for growing in gardens. It's just not commonly available in the U.S. (though I do know of a Canadian nursery that imports some species grown from tissue culture to the U.S)
-
theoneflasehaddock
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Speak for yourself, Spanky.
Your version of "we" is you yourself and nobody else. You don't speak for everyone here.
If you know the answer to a question, that's one thing but idle speculation only adds to the confusion and does much more harm than good. If you don't know the answer to a question, you should let someone who does know reply instead of you making lame guesses.
Most hardy orchids are not good candidates for tissue culture nor rapid artificial propagation.

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So you read the newsgroup in order to find answers to questions you already know the answer to?
-
theoneflasehaddock
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Do you need to twist a hat to get it onto your screwed up head?
I replied to this long dead thread at the very beginning. You should try it sometime, scraggler boy.

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Try Lebanon in the hills around Beirut. An or chid fancier I knew found 60-some varieties in a couple of acres. Even I ran into a few. zemedelec
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