Tree Types For A Boggy Soil.....

Good Evening!
Thanks for taking the time to read my post this evening.
My wife and I are doing major overhaul of our garden - one aspect that I want to change is to give us a bit of privacy, so I am really wanting to plant some fast growing trees around the edge of my property.
The only problem is that my soil is not of the best quality - I've lived in this house for over 10 year now, and the soil is really "boggy" during the winter & when it rains heavily, however it does eventually improve during the warmer months. Is there any fast growing screening trees that would survive in my particular soil type?
I was considering purchasing some Leylandii trees - I have some of these at the front of the house where the soil seems to be of a better quality - these are really flourishing at the moment, would these be suitable in the boggy soil? I really don't want to go and spend a fortune on plants, only for these to die when they are planted - so any advice would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks for your help.
Regards
Alex Glasgow, Scotland
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AlexBG

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Weeping willows grow fast and like it wet.
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In article

Birch trees I believe can handle wet feet.
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

"The best fertilizer is the gardener's shadow." - Anon
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Boggy mat be too wet.
http://www.birch-tree.com/1-birch-tree.htm
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Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

"The best fertilizer is the gardener's shadow." - Anon
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I'd consider building a berm and then plant atop that. http://www.sustland.umn.edu/implement/soil_berms.html
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I would go with echinosum's suggestion on the willows for fast growers. That is the plan here in the USA's Pac Northewest for stream recovery. You can propragate them quickly. However it seems you do have some options if you want some color it seems. What height and colors yu looking for? http://www.native-scottish-trees.org.uk /
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Gunner wrote:

Willows are deciduous so they won't offer privacy. Due to their extremely rapid growth willows are very difficult to maintain, and their roots wreak havoc, not to mention they make a mess with dropping limbs.... willows of any typle are probably the worst of all possible choices.
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Brooklyn1 wrote: ...

i agree with this, they are good for wild fields or along rivers where you don't have to mow or keep neat. otherwise i'd avoid willows.
songbird
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'songbird[_2_ Wrote:

On the basis of these comments I think you are both unaware of the variety of willow species which are available, and how different they can look if maintained into a hedge rather than allowed to grow free. There are also shrubby kinds of willow. Yes, they are deciduous. But consider plants such as beech, hornbeam and hawthorn, and these make dense hedges which offer privacy even in the winter - there are varieties of willow which will do just that, and are commonly used in that way in parts of northern Europe.
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