tree stump removal

I have a bunch of tree stumps that I have acquired. To get rid of them I've drilled a bunch of holes into them . What can I put into those holes to get them to rot. I don't want to use anything that s poisonous . Thank you for your time
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The more holes the better, fill em with any high nitrogen fertilizer and they will rot quicker. Or put a mound of Manure on top of each. The stuff in the cans for burning stumps is a high nitrogen fertilizer that is also an oxidant and is not all that terrible to use. (potassium nitrate)
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www.fungi.com. They have a lot of edible mushrooms that specialize in stumps. It will work quite well with stumps that are in shade, or are in full sun but will get shade because you plant shrubs around them.
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Not everyone can afford to hire a landscaper.

I've
get
for
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Hi. Converting a tree stump into a planter is one of the best way to decorate your garden. It's beneficial also, because the new plants will get all sorts of nutrition from the dead tree. Nowadays, more & more people are using dead tree stump as planters. By this, we can reuse the dead tree, can decorate our garden & grow more plants.
--
Jason Burke


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On Jun 19, 1:52am, Jason Burke

But isn't it challenging to hollow out the stump? Or am I not getting it...?
HB
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On 6/19/12 7:04 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

Many years ago, my neighbor planted a row Italian cypress (a southern California garden cliche) too close together along the property line between his front lawn and mine. When they grew up, every breeze caused them to batter each other, leaving bald vertical bands where they faced each other.
About 10 years ago, he had alternating trees removed, cutting them down but not grinding out the stumps. The remaining cypresses recovered and filled in where they had become bare.
Although they are regularly wet by his and my lawn sprinklers, the stumps of the removed trees are still too hard for anyone to dig out a hollow for use as a planter.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On Tue, 19 Jun 2012 19:24:16 -0700, "David E. Ross"

Cyprus is naturally rot resistant and can last a lifetime, but can still be hollowed quite easily. I've hollowed hardwood stumps (cedar) to use as a planter many times; drill a series of holes with as large a drill bit as you can handle (1/2" dia. works well), then finish with a wood chisel... it's not necessary to go more than 6"-8" deep for planter... stay a good 3' from the perimeter or your stump planter won't last but a few years before it rots through... and even then placing a plastic plant nursery pot with it's bottom cut out in the hollow works very well. Don't even need to hollow the stump, just place a planter atop. With soft woods the stump will rot and collapse in five years. Regardless, whether directly in the stump or in a pot, whatever is planted needs watering and constant moisture will accelerate the stump rotting. If a stump is less than 12" in diameter it really doesn't pay to hollow it, just place a planter atop.
http://i47.tinypic.com/2338y.jpg
http://i49.tinypic.com/2eoaa1s.jpg
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If the tree died, it might rot from the inside and leave a hollow stump.
Now I think about it, my neighbor put some plants in a stump like that. Used mulch too. Looked pretty good.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

To me, that is the way to do it...maneuver a tad of space in the center and plant something...the planting itself will help to open up the center. It'll take more than a while, but it'll happen.
Boron
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wrote:

In my experience that's pretty rare and even rarer that such a stump will be suitable for use as a planter, those would be very old and large trees that when cut down are so unevenly rotted it's best to completely remove them. And an old tree doesn't need to have died to be rotted inside... last year I cut down a huge silver maple in a hedgerow that was still very much alive but so rotted on one side that it was unsafe. Every winter after a heavy snow I spot trees that have recently fallen in the woods, they'd be slanted and held up by healthy trees nearby, but with snow on their trunk they stick out like a sore thumb. In most cases such trees are best left to rot on their own, it can be very dangerous taking a chainsaw to such a precariously balanced tree, with those leaning so they'd fall in an open area that I mow I mark with surveyer's tape to remind me to stay away and wait till they fall, they rarely make a second winter. Once on the ground they become cord wood... I have two birch that I just marked last week.
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