Tree recommendations please!

We would like to plant a tree in the front garden of our three bed semi.
We would be grateful for suggestions for trees that fulfill the following criteria:
1. It must be a tree that will not grow very tall.
2. It must have a crown that is not too dense, thus blocking light.
3. It must have foliage that changes colour through the seasons.
The garden faces due east, but in summer the sun would shine on the front of the garden, where we will plant the tree, for most of the day.
Some variety of acer has been suggested.
What do others think?
Many thanks.
D. (a beginner)
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DM wrote:

or redbud would look nice.
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Oops!
Should have said that I live in (very temperate) Ireland.
Thanks.
D.

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Look into a coral bark maple. If you can tolerate a little less of a fall colorl change then consider European mountain ash.
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It would help to know where on the planet earth you reside.
Bradford Pear is one tree that does well where we live in Zone 6. We have three of them and they are a tree for all seasons. In the spring they have flowers. In the summer they are a small beautiful tree. Then in the fall they have fall foliage. Then in winter the small cherry size pears are prized food for the squirrels. If you live in the ice belt avoid the Bradford Pear. The ice will break it up.
We also have Bloodgood Japanese Maples. There are fairly easy to grow and definitely have good foliage color with a strong tendancy toward the red-greens turning more red. Grown in zones 5-8, red Japanese maples reach a height of 30 with a spread of 20. Plant in full to partial sun and well-drained soil. In zones 7-8 these fall foliage trees can profit from the respite from the heat that theyll get if planted in an area with partial sunlight.
Flowering crab apples are spectacular in bloom, although a few weeks later than the Bradford pear, and have the added advantage (or disadvantage, depending on your viewpoint) of bearing colorful fruit, which can be ornamental in its own right, and which can provide food for wildlife during the winter.
The native dogwood, Cornus florida, is a magnificent spring-flowering tree, but it has fallen victim in our area to a fungal disease called anthracnose. There is a good deal or work going on to develop resistant varieties and hybrids. For now, Cornus kousa, the Kousa dogwood, is a good substitute, and mature specimens display very attractive bark, which extends the period of appreciation right through winter. There are many named varieties: get a recommendation from someone you trust, or try to see plants in flower over the next few months.
Another native, the Eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis), is also available as a number of cultivars, including the burgundy-leafed "Forest Pansy" and "Royal White," a variety which calls the whole "redbud" thing into question. Redbuds are easily stressed, and will develop cankers and fungal wilts in this weakened state - give them good growing conditions and adequate water.
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spam> wrote:

She said she lives in Ireland. Read ALL of the messages that came before yours.
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