Tree Protection Idea

I've staked the apple trees and several other trees using steel fence posts and wire inside of rubber hose.
A few of the branches tend to rub the posts in strong wind, plus the post tops are rather sharp, and pose a bit of hazard.
I got one of those kids foam pool toy things that looks like pipe insulation, cut sections and slipped them over the posts.
Should work.
Care Charlie
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I hope it works, plz let me know if it works
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On Jun 13, 11:43?am, Charlie wrote:

Simply put your stakes are too tall... you're set up more for fencing than staking. You need the shortest stakes possible driven into the ground at approx. a 30 deg. inward angle towards the tree and on a 3'-4' radius from the tree, use three stakes only, 120 deg apart ... then angle the wires downward to the stakes so they form an acute angle where attached to the tree and they're attached to the stakes at ground level... set the the stakes so their tops are about a foot above ground, too close to ground level will present a tractor tire hazard... abrasion problem solved. It's recommended that you use wooden stakes rather than metal. Also, remember to remove the wires and stakes by the second year, third year the latest, or the trees will not root properly for survival from wind... newly planted trees must be permitted to sway clear to the ground in order that they properly root, do not stake too ridgedly, leave plenty of slack and readjust for even more slack after the first year... only newly planted (or diseased) trees need staking. If your trees are planted very young than drive a single relatively thin and flexible bamboo stake close (3") from the trunk and lash loosely in 2-3 places with velcro tape... remove stake by the third year.
Here is an example of how I stake newly planted trees, if you look carefully you will notice the wire is loose:
http://i17.tinypic.com/4pw80ad.jpg
Here're the same trees three years later with staking removed, that first is a little leaf linden btw, all doing well:
http://i15.tinypic.com/6aeynpu.jpg
This is how I protect very young trees from deer (metal fence posts with chicken wire), the first year there was a single bamboo stake. That's a weeping copper beech, the one further back is a ginko biloba... will be a few more years before they're safe from deer but they don't need staking. Notice I leave a space to get the lawnmower under the chicken wire:
http://i15.tinypic.com/539kgo7.jpg
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Nice lookin' trees and property ya have.
As far as my staking them the way you show, that presents a serious trip and injury hazard, which is a definite concern where we live.
Thanks for the reply, and I agree the way you do them is best, but it just isn't an option where we live. And thanks for the recommendation about slack.... didn't know that. At what point should I slacken the wires? The trees have been in only a few weeks and are 7 ft apples. I have them on a really short leash now.
Care Charlie
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On Jun 14, 2:49?pm, Charlie wrote:

Thanks, it's a lot of work but I enjoy it.

I've no idea how that can be... I would think that rough ended tall steel stakes with wire running clear straight across neck high is far more hazardous than a loose wire set at a steep angle that's attached to a wooden stake that not only can be rounded but also marked with brightly hued fluorescent spray paint.

The guy wires should never be taut... loosen them so that at the point of attachment the tree can move 6-8 inches in every direction. It's perfectly normal for a tree to sway in the wind, that's what prevents it from breaking. While the tree is still very young that movement is what impels the tree to send out stabilizing roots. If you keep the tree too ridgid it won't be stimulated to send out those roots and as it becomes older it will no longer be capable of sending out stabilizing roots, once a tree begins to form mature bark at it's base it's already too late... those are often the trees that come down in a wind and everyone gawks in amazement at how small the root ball is on such a large tree that appears perfectly healthy.
Anyway 7' tall apple sapplings don't need stakes and guy wires... that's big time overkill... it's hardly ever necessary to stake and wire any tree so small a size... just the first year or two use a single bamboo stake.
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We provide supports for, and live with, folks that have physical and mental disabilities. All the gardening and tree planting and such is done here. If the potential for injury is there, I have to assume it will happen and eliminate the possibility. Also have a grandson and a big goofy dog that are below the height of the wires now, and sure as hell, they would wrap themselves around them.

Ok. I'll remove the posts and put a bamboo in. Damn, sure looks a strong wind could loosen the trees, but I'll take yer word for it.
Certainly eliminates tripping and clotheslining potential! ;-)
Thanks. Learned some good, useful things today.
Care Charlie
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On Jun 14, 11:32?pm, Charlie wrote:

Loosening is good, that will impel the tree to send out stabilizing roots. Hopefuly you didn't pack the earth around the tree too tightly, it should be back filled fairly loosely so the tree can breathe... stomping in new plantings will ensure they will probably die or at least take twice as long to recover from planting shock, don't over water either or you will drown the tree, air needs to reach the roots. And now that the tree is planted don't be running any riding lawnmower within six foot or you will compact and shift the soil, which will damage new roots, use a push mower only around trees, and not just newly planted trees, for as long as the tree lives.. it's especially important not to compact teh soil around fruit trees. Bamboo is very strong, any wind powerful enough to break the bamboo will certainly rip that tree apart regardless how it's supported. Choose a bamboo pole about 1" dia. and long enough so when driven in deeper than the bottom of the root ball it extends a few inches more than the tree is tall so you can lash the top portion of the tree as it grows, thats the weakest most vulnerable part in wind.
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t.

Done. THanks for the advice. And I didn't pack the fill in tightly, just pressed down by hand and watered..
Looks better too. No unsightly posts.
CHarlie
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On Jun 17, 12:49?pm, Charlie wrote:

I'm glad you're happy with how it turned out. I"ve no idea where you are so if you have heavy winds you can always add a second bamboo pole opposite the one you have now.
Post some pictures.
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Talked to younger son today, and he said elder son had told him about the tree staking. He had planted ten trees, all less than four feet, and was removing his tiedowns.
Can you get the binary garden picture group? One of these days I am going to dust off the software and put up a webpage, been a long time since I did that.
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On Jun 18, 12:10?am, Charlie wrote:

Simply upload your pictures to tinypic.com and post the URL.
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Sorry.
I'll post them to alt.binaries.pictures.gardens. Tomorrow.
I don't agree with the privacy/au policy at tinypics, or any "free" site, for that matter.
Charlie
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I would remove the wire and a hose and use broad-beltlike material that will allow the tree to sway without injuring the cambium zone such as wire and a hose does. http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/camb /
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
--
Many tree problems are associated with the following:

Troubles in the Rhizosphere
  Click to see the full signature.
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