tree identification

Hello, I need to identify this tree (unfortunately dying) in order to replace it with a new one of the same species.
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/2118301/DSCN0791.JPG
Many thanks, Paolo
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Here is a detail about foliage
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/2118301/DSCN0790.JPG
Thanks
On Sunday, April 27, 2014 12:05:34 PM UTC+2, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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On 4/27/2014 6:54 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

From the first photo, I thought it might be some species of cedar (perhaps Cedrus deodara). However, the foliage makes me think of coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens).
Before replacing your dead tree, it would be a good idea to find out why it died. Otherwise, you risk having another dead tree.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On Sunday, April 27, 2014 8:08:41 AM UTC-7, David E. Ross wrote:

HB
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Looks like a spruce tree... not dying, already dead.
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On Sunday, April 27, 2014 12:05:34 PM UTC+2, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Hello, thanks everybody for your answers. My idea was about some kind of fir (Abies alba ?). I would discard the Sequoia option, since the bark looks quite different, moreover the tree (sorry I forgot to mention) is in Italy, where sequoia I think are quite uncommon. The cedar theory instead, put me in doubts: looking at some pictures online, I should say it is very similar... So, how can I distinguish between a cedar and a fir ? Sorry for my incompetence, but I am just starting to work in my garden :) Anyway I would not plant the new tree exactly in the same place (close by there is a persimmon tree, which grew up a lot, so the new tree would have little sun exposure). Thanks, Paolo
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On 4/27/2014 3:13 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The general form in the first photo resembles a cedar, but the foliage in the second photo shows that it is definitely NOT a cedar.
From the illustrations in my favorite garden book, it could indeed be a fir (Abies); but it could also be a spruce (Picea). If the tree ever had cones, the distinction is easy. Fir cones point up, and spruce cones point down.
Unless you are in the mountains, I think the climate in Italy is not appropriate for either fir or spruce. I never see either growing where I live, which has a climate similar to coastal Italy. I do see many cedars. Redwoods do grow here, but they struggle.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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