Tree bark peeling from wind damage

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I have a silver maple that I planted in the spring of 2007. The trunk is about 1 1/2 inches in diameter, and stands about 9 to 10 feet tall.
North Texas storms have been coming through, and the tree now has some damage about 4 foot up the trunk.
See the pictures here... http://www.flickr.com/photos/26129857@N02 /
I've heard of bark tracing, cutting away the rough edges, as close as you can to where the bark is solidly attached to the tree. Problem is, the bark is peeling off on more than a 180 degrees of the circumfrence.
I'v also heard of wrapping it with duct tape, and checking it every three months.
What is the best method to repair this type of damage?
Is it a good idea to keep it covered, or will direct sunlight be more beneficial? Maybe some velcro straps to keep the bark as close to the inner trunk as possible?
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Good question
The tree should have the mulch kept back at least 6" from the trunk. Also why is the tree staked? I would think about planting a new tree correctly because of the degree of cambium die back. The tree must of had a severe wound which led to this situation. You can wrap black plastic with moss on the inside and moist. However you have to have living cells. That tree is in bad shape. As far as scribing - http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/S/scribing_wound.html
Some common problems with tree you should be aware of is
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Maple bark peeling http://web.extension.uiuc.edu/askextension/thisQuestion.cfm?ThreadIDw69&catID 9&AskSiteID„
"What you've described is probably a frost crack. It is very common on Norway and red maples, due to their thin bark. ............... and is a response to extreme fluctuation in temps between night and day. But trees have their own way of healing themselves, without help from us...The wood around the wound begins to produce special compounds in its cells that put up a barrier to stop decay. This is called compartmentalization. Any attempt to "help" on our part can breach that barrier and further problems can result. My advice is to wrap the trunk during the winter months for the next few years, until the tree is older,"
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Frost Cracks If frost caused frost cracks, every tree in anyone area should have them. They don't. But, when trees are present with internal cracks, and then the wood is suddenly cooled, the cracks spread outward. I have dissected trees with deep internal cracks extending from old wounds and injuries. Most cracks start from the inside out. There are cracks that do form from the outside in but they are not common and usually shallow. Your tree had a serious wound.
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John A. Keslick, Jr.
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On Tue, 29 Apr 2008 22:00:25 -0400, "symplastless"

Wrong. Many trees down here in Texas crack on the south side because of the intense heat and lack of water. They do not crack from the inside out, but the opposite. Without seeing a tree how can you make such an assessment? You're kidding, right?
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I've already stated this was caused by storm damage.
Not frost. Not lack of water. Not from the heat. Not from where the mulch is. Not because its staked. Not from improper planting. The tree is healthy.
It was not there, the storm went through, now its there. 60-80 mph straight line winds will do that to anyones tree, regardless of the greenness of their thumb.
The question was how to repair the damage.
A few days ago, I cut a paint roller brush down the length of it and wrapped it around the area, to try to prevent any further damage. When I looked at it yesterday afternoon, it had done a pretty good job on its own starting to heal. Not as much bark is separated from the inner trunk. I used some kitchen shears to cut away the jagged edges of bark and formed an oval shape.
We'll see how it goes.
Sorry to come off short, but I see this all too often in newsgroups. I appreciate anyone who has helpful comments.
Thanks.
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In article
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

<http://www.treeboss.net/tree_bark.htm
Bill
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Heal http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/H/heal.html
Compartmentalization http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/C/compartmentalization.html
Wound Dressing http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/W/wound_dressing.html
Wounds http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/wounds/index.html
And if that's short than - Tree educational material to help you understand treatments. www.shigoandtrees.com
The people who say trees and wood heals are the same people that claim wood is dead, decay is not a disease, heartrot explains decay in trees and trees heal wounds.
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I've already stated this was caused by storm damage.
Not frost. Not lack of water. Not from the heat. Not from where the mulch is. Not because its staked. Not from improper planting. The tree is healthy.
It was not there, the storm went through, now its there. 60-80 mph straight line winds will do that to anyones tree, regardless of the greenness of their thumb.
The question was how to repair the damage.
A few days ago, I cut a paint roller brush down the length of it and wrapped it around the area, to try to prevent any further damage. When I looked at it yesterday afternoon, it had done a pretty good job on its own starting to heal.
- Oh really? Trees heal wounds? Please explain. Trees compartmentalize wounds and they do not heal. You blew it right there. Heal is an animal term replacing cells in old positions with new cells. Trees do not do that. They compartmentalize wounds. So much for the wound dressing paint and the paint roller. Show me a picture of the tree healing a wound. Never heard of or seen one. Better sell it on Ebay.
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John A. Keslick, Jr.
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Heal 1 a: to make sound or whole <heal a wound> b: to restore to health http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/heal
Semantics the language used (as in advertising or political propaganda) to achieve a desired effect on an audience especially through the use of words with novel or dual meanings. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/semantics
And thanks for the link to BUY information. I'll get right on that...
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Webster really did not understand tree biology. Webster as far as I now never published papers on tree biology. Defining terms related to tree biology is better left to people that understand trees. Obviously you and Webster claim to be tree experts but do not understand tree biology.
Again I would like to see a picture of a tree healing. Or as far as that goes a root flare, a feeder root feeding and the list goes on. Trees seal but do not heal. Webster would be better explaining that to you.
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I've already stated this was caused by storm damage.
Not frost. Not lack of water. Not from the heat. Not from where the mulch is. Not because its staked. Not from improper planting. The tree is healthy.
It was not there, the storm went through, now its there. 60-80 mph straight line winds will do that to anyones tree, regardless of the greenness of their thumb.
The question was how to repair the damage.
A few days ago, I cut a paint roller brush down the length of it and wrapped it around the area, to try to prevent any further damage. When I looked at it yesterday afternoon, it had done a pretty good job on its own starting to heal. Not as much bark is separated from the inner trunk. I used some kitchen shears to cut away the jagged edges of bark and formed an oval shape.
We'll see how it goes.
Sorry to come off short, but I see this all too often in newsgroups. I appreciate anyone who has helpful comments.
You did not come off short, you came off an assault by the plant spammer, dead wood.
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Ok, then Don the word game professional. Define "Dead Wood". Please.
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symplastless
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Thank you for taking the time to define your terms. See that's the problem (not the fact that you defined your terms - that's great). People speak of material or a mass of material such as a piece of wood and its contents as being dead, non-ecologically functioning, waste, no value, etc. When in reality it is symplastless and house a great deal of living organisms and organs such as mycorrhizae. I understand that a plane is dead yet often there are many people inside the plane. To call a plane flying over above as dead is at least a half truth. Same as referring to a chunk of wood in a forest as dead. A symplastless piece of wood often specifically recognized as "dead wood" can be made up of at least 35% fungi cells alone. You stated that when you say dead wood you mean symplastless. That's fine, at least I know now what you mean. However too often the term dead wood is used and misunderstood. I do respect the fact that you defined your terms. Please understand when I say symplastless wood I do not mean dead wood, non-ecologically functioning, waste, no value, etc.
In contrast, a symplastless tree or log includes a considerable number of living cells, as much 35% of the biomass may be live fungal cells (Franklin, Shugart and Harmon, 1987, pg 551).
We document that a large symplastless tree is not a wasted resource; indeed, it continues to function as an important part of a terrestrial or water system, either while remaining on the site at which it once grew, or by becoming a structural part of an aquatic or marine habitat. We aim to help anyone interested in perpetual forest productivity to understand the importance of large, symplastless woody debris. The book develops certain principles and ideas in sequence from the forest to the sea (Maser, Tarrant, Trappe and Franklin, 1988, pg 1par5).
John
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really? i have never heard anyone speak of wood that way. you , however, are a one trick pony & unfortunately it's a very dull trick. no one cares what you say because you say the same thing, no matter what the question and no matter if the "explaination" applies or not. you are *not* an authority on trees or tree health. you have no *practical* advice to impart. lee
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wrote:

Ok, share you pictures of you dissections proving your point. You have dissected trees, right? Just show me the pictures of your dissections. Then maybe I will believe you.
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On Wed, 30 Apr 2008 20:50:04 -0400, "symplastless"

No thanks. I don't need your approval. I've already sent photos to you of other things with absoltely NO reply. Enough with the dissecting. You didn't SEE the OPs tree, so you didn't dissect it.
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wrote:

He posted a picture of a tree staked, with mulch against the trunk and most likely planted too deep which had cambium dieback and wanted to help the tree. Release it, move the mulch and start doing things correctly if you want to help the trees.
You never sent me a picture of one dissection you did. People that do not dissect trees should not be permitted to talk about trees.
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John A. Keslick, Jr.
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wrote:

Get back on your medication, dead wood.
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