Transplanting Rose of Sharon

When is a good time to transplant a Rose of Sharon plant? (I am in Zone 7). Is it better now, or early spring?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
During the daylight hours!!!
Its better you wait until next spring.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why?
opined:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Because it is easier for homo sapiens to see what they are dong when it is light.
zhan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, why spring? Ya smart ass ya!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Couldn't hold it back, it was a perfect setup. ;-)
zhan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 20 Oct 2003 22:43:05 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Mceezee) wrote:

They transplant easily. I'd do it now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 20 Oct 2003 22:43:05 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Mceezee) opined:

It is always better to transplant in fall so the roots have time to repair themselves before the ground freezes. It's easier for them to recover over the winter, than it is to withstand the heat of summer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article snipped-for-privacy@iosuefhk.net says...

I don't know about the fall but my parents have transplanted Rose of Sharon from house to house whenever they moved for longer than I'm alive and they claim that the spring is the best time to transplant them. I'm in Zone 5, Chicago so things might be better down south.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
opined:

It is very different down south where I live, but I lived the better portion of my life on Long Island which is zone 6b-7a and I always did my major transplanting in the early fall. I suppose it could be done in spring, but the person asked for opinions and I gave mine. No dogma here, just my experience.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 23:17:53 -0500, Mark Anderson

It may depend on the location. We have summer droughts that can last over a month--that will make it tough on transplants. In the spring sometimes there is excessive rain and ground saturation which is not good for digging. ROS grow like weeds. I've transplanted hundreds of them at varies times of the year and all survived. The ones transplanted in the fall grow better in the long run, but not sure the reason--maybe the roots are feeding during the winter months and foliage is not important.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There's no maybe about it. Plants transplanted in fall always do better and take much less care the following summer. The roots are always in a state of growth, even in winter, up to the point where the ground freezes at 27 degrees. Perennials, which is what trees and shrubs are, always have some part of them which stays alive. In this case, it is the roots.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Mceezee) wrote in message

Now. Because you don't have to water it often. There is nothing wrong to transplant it in spring either.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.