Transplanting/dividing daylillies

I have a clump of 'Halls Pink' which I've neglected to divide for eight years. It hasn't bloomed in two years and is tightly packed in a clump. I would like to divide them now, but I live in Texas and starting in a few days it will be in the 80-90 degree range. In June it stays high 90s till the end of October.
Can I divide them now and if so, will they have any chance of blooming this year? Also, should I just wait till fall and give up this years bloom?
Thanks. I know these are tough plants, but I've got little to no experience with them and I think I've now got the bug.
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I'm not familiar with that variety. However, I live in East Texas and have moved daylilies as late as mid-summer. I think they would bloom this year if you transplant them now and fertilize.
MaryL
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On 4/5/08 10:04 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

Do it - Halls Pink is a hardy old gal and will bloom some this year if you divide it now - like today and give her a good drink of fish juice.
C
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Yup do it now and MAKE SURE you water it in real well.
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On Sun, 06 Apr 2008 07:17:01 -0400, Cheryl Isaak

Okay, will do. It's such a nice flower and I am moving alll the drought tolerant plants up to the front gardens. I'll have mostly succulents and daylillies, with some datura and other very drought (once established) plants.
Is therre anything other than fish emulsion because I'm on the path to vegan and want to eliminate all animal derived products from my life. Wait till I tell Mark I want to get rid of the Thomasville nubuck furniture. That ought to be a fun discussion!
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seaweed emulsion, but it's not quite as good. i use it on the houseplants, because i have cats (& puppies) and who wants a house that smells like the hold of a trawler anyway? ;) i'm not vegan, but i've never been a fan of leather furniture. it's cold in the winter (up here in the hinterlands. ymmv) & sticky in the summer. the newer bamboo or hemp upholstery fabrics are quite nice... the few upholstered pieces i own are cotton twill however. lee <had a vegan housemate for years, so am aware of the problems>
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On 4/6/08 10:53 AM, in article Xns9A786ECE1A110enigmaempirenet@199.125.85.9,

The seaweed stuff is pretty good.
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wrote:

I always add black strap molassas to the seaweed and I only buy the sulfured molassas. Our pH is high down here in TX.
Our leather furniture feels like suede it is very soft and not like polished leather. It has a slight nap to it. I just don't want it any more. I suppose I can always have it re-upholstered, but what I really want it a modular pit couch. I have some pieces of cotton twill, almost canvas or duck from Ikea which I really like very much. We'll see.
As for heat and cold, it's so hot in summer I don't know people who live here without air conditioning. I'm sure there are some poor folks because they are always collecting fans every year go give away. For this heat the leather stays cool in summer so is nice. I simply don't want it any more.
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Alfalfa pellets Water well first, apply about a cup of pellets to a fairly large plant. and then water lightly again. The pellets will swell up and start to fall apart. Each time you water they will soon disappear. They have a growth hormone, lots of trace minerals, and help to make your soil nice and "fluffy". They're just like getting the cow manure, except you are bypassing the cow part! I get them at the local feed store, Emilie NorCal
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wrote:

That's a great idea I forgot all about! The feed store sells huge 40 pound bags for about 15 dollars. I can use those to make my compost tea also. Thanks for the reminder.
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