Transplanting a mulberry tree.

While I'm asking questions, I have a Mulberry tree that's growing in the middle of my yard, not really in a great location, and I'd love to move it so it could help block the afternoon sun like it's late, great ancestor used to. The only problem is the tree is now seven feet tall.
Can this tree be moved or would I be killing it? I'm pretty good at transplanting, but I know from our old mulberry tree that they're touchy about having anything done to them. If there's a chance it would live, when would be the best time to move it, and about how much excavating am I looking at where the roots are concerned? Also, can mulberries get girdled roots? We just lost a Gum tree to that and it pissed me off, I loved that tree.
(I know some people hate mulberry trees, but I love the leaves and the birds it attracts, plus I'm getting roasted in my yard since the old mulberry tree had to come down.)
Thanks again! -I'm thinking of changing my name to "No luck keeping trees". :)
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On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 23:16:27 GMT, TQuinn transmitted this:
I take it the tree will die if I try to move it, and you don't have the heart to tell me? :)

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I've tranplanted mulberries bigger than that. It's quite some work(especially here in the Ozarks), but it can be done. It would be best to do it during the late winter/early spring, while it's dormant. I transplanted one a couple of years ago, and it seems to be doing fine. Of course, that might have something to do with the fact that I planted it right beside my chicken coop, where the soil is very fertile, and gets plenty of water. I've also transplanted other trees, walnuts, oaks, black cherry, sycamores, dogwoods, redbuds, and a few others on my property, but I've learned to try to get them when they're smaller.
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On Thu, 09 Sep 2004 01:45:31 -0500, The Watcher transmitted this:

Good to hear, thanks. I was planning on starting to move it in January/Feburary, is that good? (That's saying there won't be three feet of snow on the ground, I'm in NY.) Also, would making a trench around the tree help with the roots? I've done that with much smaller plants, and I'm not sure if the same would apply to a tree.
Thanks again!
-T
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divide the root zone into sectors and cut through the outside of every other sector now. Then when you dig up the tree in the fall/winter it will have a head start on a new, compact root ball. For more info about the International Society of Arboriculture, please visit http://www.isa-arbor.com/home.asp . For consumer info about tree care, visit http://www.treesaregood.com /
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It would probably help. I've done it sometimes. Usually I just dig up the tree, trying to get as many of the roots as possible. The soil I have here doesn't form a rootball very well, so I just let it fall away from the roots and transplant the tree bare-root, watering it in with plenty of good soil around the roots in the new spot.

You're welcome.
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