Too late to plant herbs?

Is it too late to plant herbs and perennials? Or perhaps a different way to say this, is there a better time this year to plant herbs and perennials? Specifically I'm thinking of Thyme and Echinacea. That plot of land that I discussed in this group a while back is ready, minus some more soil, and I'd like to get something in the ground so that in the spring its can do its own thing.
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It would help if you'd tell where you're located. Most likely this is a good time to get them in the ground so they can establish themselves before winter.
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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True. This all assumes northern hemisphere, and exact dates may vary depending on how much time you have until cold weather arrives.

Yes, but don't wait too long. As soon as the summer heat is (mostly) abated, which would be around now or a few weeks from now most places, is my favorite time for fall planting. Ideally, you'd plant when the weather forecast calls for several days of clouds and/or rain. If the plants get hit with heat/sun, just water a lot for the first few days/weeks and perhaps even try shading with shadecloth or the like (until the plants stop drooping. The Echinacea will droop quite visibly, and although it won't really perk up until its roots get established, it will appreciate the water during this period. Once it stops dropping, I stop watering it).
Thyme I think is pretty forgiving. At least, I don't think I've killed one yet. But I don't really remember what times of year I planted each of them.
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Thanks all, I appreciate the help. I keep forgetting that you all don't know who I am and where I live - Seattle. We're predicting full sunny days today maybe tommorrow, then here comes the rain again.
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Well we'll see how they do. 4 lemon thyme plants and 3 echinaceas and about 4 bags of compost tilled in.
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In Seattle you can move field grown plants most any time. I would avoid green house grown plants. Enjoy!
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"Eigenvector" wrote:

Perennials do very well planted through late fall, as do perennial herbs.... a good time to pick up bargains from nurserys, as they need to be planted before the ground freezes.
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On Thu, 23 Aug 2007 20:38:56 -0700, "Eigenvector"

Our winters are mild, summers are long hot and dry. Perennials planted in the fall seem to do better. In another climate planting times can be different.
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