Tomato wilt

This is the first year I have lost tomato plants to what looks like Fusarium - Tomato Wilt. Some of the smaller plants struggled and died, but about 1/5 of thetotal planting survived, though even they are not exactly bearing up a storm. Only a few cherry and grape tomatoes survived; the grape tomato fruit is especially delicious.
I went to this Web site:
http://www.uvm.edu/extension/publications/gardendisease/gd18.htm
which says the fungi survive in the soil INDEFINITELY!
Terrifying!
1. How can I get rid of them? Have to scrape away all soil? How deep?
2. Is it worth taking a chance planting the varieties that the Web site says are more resistant?
Better Boy Heinz 1350     Beefsteak Roma VF     Big Girl Rutgers     Campbell Springset     Floramerica Supersonic
Note that I planted several of the above, and labeled them carefully, but now I can't tell what survived!
2. What other vegs can I plant in that area that won't be affected by the Fusarium wilt? Onions? Beans? What????
TIA
Persephone (who feels like a traitor buying outside tomatoes!)
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<Persephone> wrote in message

Plant the tomatoes in a different spot each year. Don't even think about trying to remove the soil. That would be nuts.

Yes, but I've found Rutgers was not as resistant as claimed. Better Boy is a great choice. I've got Brandywine this year, which in theory should NOT be resistant, but it's doing fine.

Too many to list. A google search will help.
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Sorry about your wilt problem - I have it too. As Joe says, plant resistant varieties. Look in the catalog at the tomato listings: all those with VF after the names are the ones you should choose. The VF indicates resistance (not necessarily immunity) to Verticillium and Fusarium wilts. Don"t put the vines on your compost heap. The authorities say to bury them (Where??) or throw them in the trash. Be sure to mulch the plants with hay or other good stuff like chopped leaves, after the soil is well warmed up, to prevent spores splashing up from the soil. Rotating them around the garden is necessary, as for all crops. I have a three-year rotation, because I have 3 plots, and only plant resistant varieties. Favorite one is Jetstar. Good luck! Wendy
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How's the taste with Jetstar? Does it have enough acidity to still taste like a tomato, instead of candy, like some hybrids?
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i find Jetstar grown in my garden/climate is pretty watery & bland. it grows really well, but it's not very tasty so i don't plant it anymore.
lee
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

for real big tomato taste try these http://personalpages.bellsouth.net/t/h/theplanter/tomato.html
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On Sat, 15 Sep 2007 10:40:34 -0400, "Joseph S. Larson"

Urggghhh! Thanks for the heads-up. I don't think I've been putting them in the compost heap, but will certainly NOT do it now; will put out in trash (yard waste). Hope it does not spread the evil to whatever the City does with yard waste!
Be sure to mulch the plants with hay or other good stuff like chopped leaves, after the soil is well warmed up, to prevent spores splashing up from the soil
Urgggh again! What a ghastly image!
In this area, soil doesn't cool off/freeze as in some other areas. We plant all year round; time to start putting in "winter crops" like snow peas, spinach, bok choy,etc. (these I put in a different area).
In the wilt-affected area, I ventured to plant green onions, so am afraid to mulch before the little guys stick up their heads so I can avoid them..
Rotating them around the garden

Tx a bunch, Wendy for all the great info.
I feel like a dumb-dumb re-planting tomatoes in the same area. Perhaps I let my guard down because have NEVER had Tomato Wilt before. Now a believer!
Persephone
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<Persephone> wrote in message

To confuse matters further, some years are worse than others for plant diseases. Next year, you might have problems at all, you'll attribute it to moving the plants, and the year after, everything gets hammered. It's part of the adventure, and often a major frustration.
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On Sat, 15 Sep 2007 09:51:28 -0700, Persephone wrote:

Just to complicate the issue, our "city" composts all yard waste, then makes it available to the public.
I don't use it.
Care Charlie
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1) plant resistant varieties elsewhere next year 2) solarize 3) dig in plenty of well cured compost
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubM ed&list_uids913017&doptstractPlus
http://plantpath.osu.edu/faculty-and-staff/faculty/hoitink-harry-a-j
http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/GARDEN/ENVIRON/soilsolarization.html
http://vric.ucdavis.edu/veginfo/ topics/soils/soilsolarization.pdf

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