Tomato foliage withering

I put in several different varieties of tomato this year. Got a late start so did not grow from seed; bought plants.
They started out like gangbusters; bore plenty of fruit. But foliage began to look crappy and twisted (no critters; I checked), and plants have now been almost denuded.
They have had food, water, and plenty of sunshine. So why?...
This is So Calif coastal.
TIA
HB
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Higgs Boson wrote: ...

what kind of tomatoes?

dunno. need a better description than "crappy and twisted".
picture of leaf and stem would help, but even then it could be something other than disease.

songbird
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On Monday, July 22, 2013 4:14:20 AM UTC-7, songbird wrote:

OK, finally took pic.
http://tinypic.com/r/2z8szsz/5
I took another that showed a healthy plant right behind this one, but got *****ed up on TinyPic. Can't seem to figure it out <g>
HTH
HB
HTH
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Fusarium Wilt, this fungal disease most often affects tomatoes. It enters a plant through natural openings and wounds in the roots and grow up into the stem, where it blocks the supply of nutrients and water to the leaves. The first indication of infection is when a part of the plant starts to wilt on sunny afternoons, though it usually recovers when the temperature drops (this often starts to happen when plants begin bearing fruit). Eventually the infection spreads through the whole plant, lower leaves turn yellow (and may eventually die) and the stem becomes discolored. Plants dont always die, but it slows growth and reduces yields. Fusarium is rarely a problem for commercial growers because most modern tomato varieties have been bred to be very resistant. If you stick with resistant varieties you dont have to worry about it either. Many of the older heirlooms dont have any resistance. If any plants start to show symptoms of partial wilting you should remove them immediately to reduce the spread of this disease. The spores can survive in the soil for up to 7 years. It looks as if the tomatoes may be in a raised box, so if it is Fusarium Wilt, don't reuse the soil for Solanaceae. Be sure to disinfect tools used in the soil to prevent spreading the disease.
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On Saturday, July 27, 2013 10:13:45 PM UTC-7, Billy wrote:

Mierda! Thanks -- I guess!! <g> I will dig up and trash tomorrow!!! An d warn nursery where purchased.
Hope disease will not attack other tomatoes in same general area but some o f them already look iffy. Sheeeeeeet!!!
The two originally infected plants are the "tried & true" tomato varieties sold in this area *forever*. Must have been infected when sold ??
Re: solancea: I don't eat eggplant, but I love Bell Peppers. Just out of curiosity I had purchased (from Home Depot, $10.98) a large container of R ed Bells that I set down in the middle of that area. It does not have cont act with soil; only aperture for water to exit, but will move out of cautio n. The label said leave the plants in there; fruit will mature. Gardener agrees. Huge Bells are ripening. If I get 10 fruits, that will pay for th e plant, since Bells are very expen$ive, even in summer.
I went on-line for ways to disinfect the soil. Gardens Alive had this:
http://www.gardensalive.com/article.asp?aix6
and this:
http://www.gardensalive.com/disease-control/c/15/
Big pain to make raised beds, bring soil from elsewhere in yard and buy com mercial soil to modify. But next year, if I'm spared, will have to do it, because this area gets the most sun considering the near beach morning/eve ning overcast and the ****ed up seasons these last few years (global warmin g).
HB
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I had this problem with basil. Tried a second year with same results. I used the bed for lettuce for the next 3 years, and basil was OK on the 4th year. Seven years is guaranteed to remove Fusarium Wilt, but it can happen sooner.
I managed to overwhelm my tomato bed this year (2 - 3 yr. rotation), and potted 3 of the early ripening ones in 5 gal. pots. They are ahead of the bedded tomatoes, and give me something to nibble on while waiting for the rest of the crop.
How were the tomatoes from your diseased vines?
This may be helpful. Len used to often post here, but I haven't seen anything from him for awhile. <http://www.lensgarden.com.au/straw_bale_garden.htm He is also somewhat evangelical, but separates his gardening, form his beliefs rather well.

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Higgs Boson said:

That's a pretty vague description, but with only that to go on, and keying off of the word "twisted," it suggests either some sort of virus infection (which could have been brought in by a hit-and-run pest, or by a person working with the plants who had previously had contact with tobacco or some other plant that was carrying a virus) or maybe herbicide damage. You found no obvious pests, but thrips and spider mites are pretty tiny and you might need a hand lens to spot them.
Pictures and more info might be helpful. Any yellowing? Did it go 'top down' or 'bottom up' the plants? Lesions on stems?
Sad to say, but mass produced plants shipped all over the country have been responsible for spreading some nasty stuff around. That having been said, even seeds can sometimes carry disease, and I've thrown out some suspicious tomato seedlings in the past.
<http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/vegetable/tomato-problem-solver/ <http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/DiagnosticKeys/TomWlt/TomWiltKey.html
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On 7/22/2013 8:00 AM, Pat Kiewicz wrote:

I've been worried about this as purchased seedlings were hit while nearby heirloom plants from my seedlings were untouched. Friend who got seedlings from the same place is having the same problem.
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"So. Calif coastal" may sat it all. How many days have you had in the 80s? Tomatoes thrive on heat.
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Mine look the same this year. :( I think it has been the weather here, as Billy said they like heat. Are they not native to Mexico? My niece's and father's plants here look the same strangly not very lush... Hopefully they will rebound for the second half of the season.
My cucumber plants have been growing like zucchini though. Got two last week, and they were over a foot long! And were not seedy inside; they were still filling out but I thought I better pick them.
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or 2 during the heat of the day. That may come back to bite you as mildew later, though.
Talk to someone in your area. As Susan N, "The Cook" says, find your local ag. extention office. <http://www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension/index.html

The wild tomato species are native to western South America from Ecuador south to northern Chile and the Galapagos Islands.
They like heat but 80F is probably optimum. They will start exhibiting problems when morning temps are in the 90s, or night time below 45F.

This is agriculture, not science. Do every thing right, and hope for the best. Too little, too much, wrong time, or der Zorn Gottes, and you're toast.

They get bitter, if too large.
Good luck.
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Actually, here there have a been a couple weeks it was not hot. Cool and in the 70s/60s and lots of rain. The last couple years, the tomato plants grew great but there was not the cool periods and huge rains so much.

I was afraid of that, but actually it was okay. And not seedy. Strange. I had a zucchini plant in same spot that went crazy and grew huge zucchini.
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