tomato blossom without friuts

My tomato is blossoming, but no pruit at all, what is the problem? thank you.
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Cart before the horse?
The fruit do not mature until the flowers have faded.

you.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (tutu) writes in article
-0700:

The fruit grows after the blossoms are pollenated (and fertilized). Be patient.
-- spud_demon -at- thundermaker.net The above may not (yet) represent the opinions of my employer.
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On 18 Jun 2004 13:23:31 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (tutu) wrote:

Patience? You can get better tomato flower pollination by planting the herb borage, the "bee plant," in your garden.
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tutu wrote:

The flowers are not being pollinated.
--
Travis in Shoreline Washington

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Travis wrote:

As Travis said, the flowers NEED to be pollinated. Quite often, early in the season, especially during rainy periods the blooms will not be pollinated. Just give them a little more time (and good weather) and you should see some tomatoes.
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

Digital Camera: HP PhotoSmart 850
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (tutu) wrote in

Perhaps your plants are suffering from too much 'pee'. Or maybe 'you' and 'I' are getting mixed up.
Ribbing aside, I think it was at least a week (maybe even two or three) before my flowers started changing into tomotoes. IIRC tomatoes do okay with wind pollination (but insect pollination is better), and if it gets too hot (>90F?), they will abort. I don't know if that means the flowers will drop off or if it just won't fruit.
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That's pretty interesting, flowers turning into veggies!
She/he asked about tomatoes and you give an answer about "tomotoes", what is wrong with you? ;-)
All ribbing aside, what is a "tomotoe"?
'enry VIII
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'tomato' is native to South America, but do not know the etymology (origin) of the word 'tomato'. The word tomato actually is a corruption of the name of a Chief of the Andean Patchului tribe, Tomo, and the Spanish word for toe, 'dedo'. After 'discovering' the tomato a few days prior, the Spaniards came upon Tomo who was returning from a trip into the lowlands. The Spaniards noticed the immature fruit of the tomato bore a striking resemblance to Tomo's toes, which were green from wearing alpaca yarn socks in the jungle (*not* a good idea). So they called the plant 'tomo-dedoes'. Much later, after Thomas Jefferson (?) proved that tomatoes were not poisonous, the name was Anglicized to 'tomato', because quite frankly, nobody wants to think about somebody's nasty bloated gangrene toes when eating their salad. But knowledgeable English speakers still call the immature fruit 'tomotoes' (while knowledgeable Spaniards will say 'tomodedos'). You can read more about this fascinating subject in "The True History of Edible Plants" by Lion Trumeteef.
As for turing a flower into a vegetable, that is reputed to be the work of the government. http://lamar.colostate.edu/~samcox/Tomato.html
Now, if you'll excuse me, I intend to put on my 'embarassed' hood and run off into the night. :-)
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LOL
'enry VIII

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Well, i was looking into this subject.....Tomatoes are not coming form South America, in fact they are from North America, Mexico exaclty (Technically North America). In nahuatl (aztec language) this fruit is called tomatl....than in spanish tomate...and english tomatoe....
--
Paulo
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Actually all the Lycopersicon species are native to South America but the large fruited cultivars were developed in cultivation by the Aztecs of Mexico in Pre-Columbian times.

corruption
from
(?)
somebody's
knowledgeable
about
Lion
work
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (tutu) wrote in message

I understand this to be a pollination problem. There is a product on the market called Blossom Set which will set the blossoms on tomato plants. It comes in a spray. I'm not sure if it will work on other plants, but it worked on my tomatoes pretty good.
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