Taste of Fall

Taste of Fall in the Catskills
Red Maple
http://i55.tinypic.com/20pttmf.jpg
Birch, Maple, Spruce:
http://i53.tinypic.com/dxxqiw.jpg
Maple:
http://i53.tinypic.com/2d9ei5h.jpg
Ornamental Pear
http://i52.tinypic.com/1opvn5.jpg
Birch:
http://i54.tinypic.com/2euil9f.jpg
Assorted including young Planetrees:
http://i54.tinypic.com/rsbmzt.jpg
Maples:
http://i56.tinypic.com/jhyp09.jpg
View:
http://i53.tinypic.com/ei6pmx.jpg
Kentucky Coffee Tree:
http://i51.tinypic.com/x0ns5h.jpg
The kids, Jilly & Blackie:
http://i53.tinypic.com/i4k37c.jpg
Let it snow:
http://i53.tinypic.com/5pjyf8.jpg
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Brooklyn1 wrote:

very nice
David
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On Fri, 29 Oct 2010 11:06:14 +1100, "David Hare-Scott"

Thank you.
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Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Hmmm... I have a few questions: Does the trunk of the ornamental pear and others seem too tall for the trunk width? Do you add fertilizers to the trees? Have you pruned the trees?
I had two maples, I added fertilizers to the maples and they grew fast, tall and beautiful. I did not prune them and the tops were thick with leaves. Then one day strong winds cracked the trunks of the six year old trees. My failure to prune the tops of the trees to help the wind flow through.
I hope the same does not happen to you. I am just curious on what care has been done for your trees, if any.
--
Enjoy Life... Dan L (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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Dan L wrote:

The ornamental pear (redspire) was pruned to that height from the nursery, it seems about right as it's at shoulder height (perfect for mowing underneath) while the overall height is now about 25'... about twice the height as when planted seven years ago.
Same pear in blosom this past spring:
http://i51.tinypic.com/15xuyxh.jpg
http://i53.tinypic.com/2mnesy1.jpg
http://i55.tinypic.com/20qhv0l.jpg
Second redspire pear:
http://i52.tinypic.com/bz98n.jpg
Young trees being more supple don't need much pruning for wind resistance but still may require some pruning for esthetics and to remove branches that rub. With older trees I do prune to open the centers for better air flow and to permit sun to enter. As to fertilzing I do drive in those spikes for the first couple of years but once established they're on their own. It's more important to deeply water newly planted trees being careful not to over water.
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Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

I was just curious. With the newer closer photos it does look like air could flow through easily. Thanks for answering my curiosity. I over did it with the fertilizers in the past. I have used the spike years ago. Now I just punch holes around the trees and put compost around them a couple times a year. I do prune, but not as much as I should. Afraid of doing more harm than good.
--
Enjoy Life... Dan L (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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On Fri, 29 Oct 2010 17:16:18 +0000 (UTC), Dan L

You are correct, overfertilizing is more harmful than no fertilizing. Once established roots will expand to compensate for the tree's nutritional needs. I operate from the point that fertilizing inhibits root system maturity. Naturally one should check that the soil is suitable for the type of tree; ph, drainage, and exposure are much more important than fertilizing. Trees are very efficient at storing nutrients.
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I find it hard to keep fruit trees going well without fertilising even though my soil is quite rich with high CEC. Especially the citrus need to be fed yearly. But I am not talking about concentrated chemical fertilisers, if I used those it might last longer. The ornamentals I don't fertilise although most are natives; acacias, callistemons, eucalypts etc, which are well adapted to less than wonderful soils.
David
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On Sat, 30 Oct 2010 08:59:37 +1100, "David Hare-Scott"

Orchard/grove trees are very different from specimen, ornamentals, shade trees... that's like comparing annuals to perennials.
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beautiful pictures! the red maple is my fav. What a wonderful tree.
Donna in WA 8-9 zone
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Thank you. That tree was planted more than 50 years ago. Here's another view:
http://i51.tinypic.com/15mlo2o.jpg
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<a polite snip>

Another great picture! Do you prune this tree to keep it in this shape or is it just Mother Nature showing off?
Donna in WA zone 8-9
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I trained the deer to be landscapers.... they keep the lower branches of trees perfecly trimmed... if I could only train them to mow grass as well. Maybe if I imported some Mexican deer... lol
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