taking care of tools (j)

how do you take care of your tools? I notice that my tools, such as my anvil lopper and shears rust easily if they are placed in the garage. I don't have another place where I can store those tools.
is there a spray that would prevent them from rust?
what would be a solution to prevent rust?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@catlover.com (Kilroy Bass) wrote:

I have a bucket which I fill with sand then put a quart of oil in. Stick tools in it when I think of it. Works for me.
William (Bill)
--
Zone 5 S Jersey USA Shade Earth sometimes.
There is atleast one word misspelled deliberately in the above post. ;))
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kilroy Bass wrote:

Wipe down with a rag soaked in any sort of NON-DRYING oil, such as used motor oil. Once every 6 or so months, and you're done.
Drying oils (such as linseed) work too, but the rags present a spontaneous combustion hazard, since "drying" really means oxidation (which means heat). Store the rag in a jar if only for neatness' sake.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

don't
Ask a dermatologist and he/she will confirm that it's not wise to handle used motor oil, which is why quite a few mechanics wear disposable latex gloves nowadays. I believe it's been connected with skin cancer.
If you're only going to apply oil to the tools every 6 months, do it with linseed oil using a piece of rag small enough to fit into a coffee can. Stick it in the can and light it. No more spontaneous combustion issues.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

don't
Wipe them down to remove any dirt, and if you've been pruning any diseased material a squirt of rubbing alcohol wouldn't hurt, then give them a light spray of WD40.
pam - gardengal
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

WD-40 is good for short term use, but too light for lasting effects. A heavier grade oil would be better.
Bob S.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oil them. WD40 spray works, but is expensive, car engine oil is cheaper, but you have to use a cloth to apply it.

don't
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

don't
I clean my tools with steel wool then spray with PAM, the cooking spray. It is great to oil and prevent rust. A garage is a good place to store tools. Putting an oil on them before they are rested goes a long way to preserving them.
Another tip...PAM is also a must to have on hand to spray sticky finger after picking up pine cones.
Wil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@catlover.com (Kilroy Bass) wrote in message

Ordinary white lithium grease---you can get a tub of it cheap at any auto parts store or at Wally World, etc. Put it on a rag and wipe the tools with a light coating. a one pound tub will last many seasons.
BTW, turpentine is excellent for removing sap from loppers, pruners, etc.
J. Del Col
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fill a large bucket with sand and dump in the spent oil from your next oil change. Pushing your tools into the sand will clean and protect them from rust. During the winter, I'll sharpen shovels, hoes, axes, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.