Surprise Amaryllis And Question

I bought my first amaryllis at Rite-Aid about 3 years ago. I stuck it in a pot with some purple shamrocks and it bloomed in a couple of weeks. From some reading, I thought the leaves would die and then I was to cut them back, remove the bulb, and after dormancy could force more blooms. I just had a few years of the shamrock constantly blooming and the boring amaryllis leaves and I didn't know what to do so just kept them in the east window and watered them when dry. I watered the plants a few days ago and noticed nothing. Then, today, there are these two huge red flowers ready for the holiday. How do I rest the bulb properly after this? Could I get some more flowers by Christmas?
TIA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The best way is to let it bloom, cut off the spent bloom stalks, left it and let it rest, then replant it in a pot by itself. If you force it a lot, it'll drain the bulb and kill it off. Forcing is not good. Took this long to rebuild itself to bloom again.
--
Dragons Must Fly when Thread's in the Sky

www.starlords.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

Amaryllis bulbs really should spend the summers outdoors. There are several factors in getting it to bloom successfuly year after year. It should be in a pot that is only two inches bigger than the diameter of the bulb. It needs to be put outside when there is no more risk of frost, and left outside either until there is a risk of frost in the fall, or the foliage had died back naturally. It should be given a weak (1/4 strength) fertilizer every watering, or every other watering. It does not need a cold period, but should rest for three months of so in a dark cool place. After this period, you can bring it back into the light, and water it sparingly. In about six weeks a flower stalk should emerge. Once it has started to emerge you can start regular watering and light fertilizing.
The flower scapes start to form 12-18 months before they bloom, so it might take a couple of years to get it blooming regularly. They don't naturally bloom at Christmas - Easter is a more normal flowering time. The ones you see for sale in the fall have been pulled from the field early, and dried a couple of months before the ideal time - they have been forced for Christmas blooms. That doesn't really harm them, but it means that you frequently won't get a bloom the next year, because they didn't have enough time to form the scapes.
If you want Christmas blooms, buy a new one in the fall.
BP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thank you Starlords and Bonnie.

The pot is the right size. I'll just have to repot it separately from the shamrock in the same pot after the flowers are gone.
It needs to be put outside when there is no more risk of

I summer many of my houseplants in the backyard so that will be fine. I'm guessing partial shade would be about right.
It should be given a weak

I did buy the bulb during the Christmas shopping season and planted and forced it myself.

I'll take your suggestions and maybe try to shoot for more blooms next Easter.
The snow is coming down tonight and I ran outside to pick 3 tulips that will do me more good inside than outside.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I got some butterfly amaryllis bulbs/plants very recently from a friend of mine that she had growing in the ground in her yard. They had multiplied to the point that she had to thin them out. I had forgotten that I had given her a bulb or two 6 or 8 years ago. Since then, I had lost mine that were in pots.
Tom Miller, Clearwater, FL ................................................ If you like tropical plants like hibiscus, please see: <http://trop-hibiscus.com ......................................... "If stupidity got us into this mess, then why can't it get us out?" Will Rogers ................................................
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I like most of the info listed here. With our greenhouse amaryllis we treat them a little differently. A new bud for a flower stem develops for every several leaves. So therefore, the more leaves the better. Depending on where you live, I'd grow in full sun (20-30%shade in the south). After flowering, if the leaves are up and growing, start fertilizing on a regular basis. We use full strength fertilizer every week until mid August. Then begin withholding water and all fertilizer. Sprinkle lightly with water now and then until the end of Sept - beginning of Oct. Cut off withered leaves, repot in a pot 2-3" larger than the bulb diameter (varies if you're doing clumps and don't let the roots dry out - that is don't let the bare bulb sit unpotted for any length of time like you see in the store), and water very sparsely until new growth or flower stem shows. Sometimes we get one first then the other, and sometimes vice versa. We usually get flowers at Christmas and flowers again at Easter in this way. It's important to remember to give the plant as much light as you can give it during winter, and don't overwater. Water only as much as the plant can use as determined by the soil drying out. They're not too tricky once you get the hang of it, and they're very rewarding. Gary
says...

in a pot

some
remove
years
I
them
there
bulb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Skirmishd wrote:

See my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_hippeastrum.html . It describes the differences between the bulb commonly called "amaryllis" and the genus Amaryllis. The former is in genus Hippeastrum, and that page goes into some detail about my experience with that genus.
--

David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Ross wrote:

I have saved you site for future reference. It appears that what I have is a Hippeastrum. I appreciated the link you had to the CSU Coop Extension site as the plant and I live in Colorado. Unfortunately, I couldn't look at the pictures of your Hippeastrums (ia?) but will try again later.
Thank you for your help.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.