Suckers from tree base

I put in two very young fruit trees about 4-5 months ago. Both are doing well. However, there are suckers appearing from the bases. At least I THINK that's what they are.
Any advice on what to do?
This is So. Calif coastal.
TIA
HB
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On Mon, 5 Sep 2011 11:28:25 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

Should be obvious, any shoots below the graft should be nipped off... above the graft is at your descretion, depends on how you want the tree to grow... some prefer multi-trunked fruit trees. What kind of fruit trees?
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On 9/5/11 11:28 AM, Higgs Boson wrote:

What kind of fruit trees?
Were they grafted? If so, can you see the graft?
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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It looks like they were. I can see the graft.
The one in question is a Santa Rosa Plum.
I also noticed what looks like suckers on a Dwarf Washington Orange, about 3-4 years old, that bore last year for the first time.
TIA
HB

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On 9/6/11 5:59 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

If they are from below the graft, remove them. Do NOT cut them. Instead, try to pull them. You might have to dig down a bit and break them from the root or base of the trunk. Cutting a sucker generally guarantees that it will sprout again with more shoots.
I have a dwarf 'Robertson' navel orange, which differs from the 'Washington' primarily by ripening a few weeks earlier. I've had it since about 1992. It bore fruit sporadically, sometimes going 2-3 years without any oranges at all. Last year, however, it had a nice crop following a crop in 2009 -- the first time it had fruit two years in a row. This year, there are a few oranges (still quite green).
The problem with dwarf oranges is that they do not have a large enough crop. I could eat twice as many as my little tree produces. On the other hand, even a dwarf lemon tree produces far more lemons than anyone can use. See my <http://www.rossde.com/cooking/lemon_marmalade.html for a recipe for lemon marmalade. Last year, I had enough lemons for this recipe, lemons to give away, and lemons to juice for my wife to use in cooking. We also have a large plastic bag of lemon zest in the freezer.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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David E. Ross wrote:

We have three lemon trees and aside from freezing zest and juice we make lemon cordial, much more flavour than the commercial kind, cheaper and keeps well without refrigeration. A great drink for a hot day with cold water or soda. We did have a guest who liked the flavour but wouldn't eat the zest and fruit pulp, tossing 1/5 of each glass down the drain. tsk tsk.
D
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I have an old lemon tree that keeps on producing like the Energizer Bunny. It was about the first thing I planted when I bought the house long ago. Since I put lemon on just about everything, I am saving a load of $$$ over what lemons cost in the market. I also give away a lot.
How do you make lemon cordial?
TIA
HB
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Higgs Boson wrote:

You can adapt this to suit the number of lemons and bottles that you have. Discard any rotten fruit then wash, drain and zest the lemons, making sure only the yellow zest is collected. Then juice them, measuring the juice as you go, if some pulp goes through the juicer I leave it in but you can strain it out if you prefer. Put the juice and zest in an enamel or SS saucepan and bring it to the boil. Stir in the same volume of white sugar as juice, return to the boil, then boil gently stirring occasionally for 15 minutes. Bottle in clean glass bottles with good lids, stirring as you go so each gets some zest. It will keep at room temperature for months. If you like it more tart use less sugar, say 3/4 or 2/3, it will still keep well.
To serve shake the bottle and dilute to taste (this is stronger than commercial cordial) with cold soda water or cold water in the glass, stir and top with a fresh slice of lemon: instant lemonade. Also yummy on vanilla icecream undiluted.
D
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Sounds good. Tx a lot.
HB
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This advice applies equally to the Plum and to the Dwarf Orange??
HB

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On 9/6/11 10:53 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

This applies to any grafted plant, including roses, cherries, peaches, loquats. It also applies to non-grafted plants that seem to proliferate suckers (e.g., Brazilian pepper trees, crepe myrtle, poplars), all of which can create major thickets.
For grafted plants that develop suckers above the graft, treat the suckers as you would any new shoots. That is, either remove them or encourage them. This also includes rose suckers from own-root (non-grafted) roses.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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