Stuck between a rock and a hard place

A few weeks ago I completed a 60 ft. walkway with small to medium size flagstone (3/4 inch to 1 1/2 inch thick) I wanted a "natural" look so I layed them all directly on the dirt, sweeping in the cracks slightly - planted steppables in between. Problem is they're all very mobile. Not a sturdy path at all. Any 'fix' suggestions? Fill the cracks with sand? more dirt? gravel? Or will they settle in a few years? I'm not opposed to tearing it all up I just had wanted something very natural and it does look good!
Thank you very much!
Kevin Miller Ft Wayne, IN
P.S. These stones range from football size to 16" pizza size P.P.S. I don't mind a little movement - I just don't want someone to get hurt (twist an ankle)
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Its times like those when you ponder "What would Bob Vila do?"
Its always much easier to plan carefully in advance than to mess up a job and try to figure out what you did wrong after the fact, isn't it?
Your time would be better spent watching the Home and Garden channel instead of "Home Improvement" with Tim Allen! Argh, Argh, Argh!!

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They should have been laid on sand or a layer of pea gravel, which conform to the stones' undersides.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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Been there. Done that (albeit on a smaller scale). Ripped it up and started over...
They'll settle but probably more than you would like. Depending on the type of soil you have, they may actually start sinking below the level of the soil. They will become more stable as they settle but they'll never be as firm underfoot as they would be if you'd laid them on a proper base. You may also find that the thinner stones will tend to crack.
Alas, I don't think there is an easy fix, short of making it a path "for looking at only". You could tackle it bit by bit, lifting each stone, excavating, and putting in a base. There's a reason that even a 'natural' flagstone path laid directly into grass (and mowable) needs to have base under each stone.
-- Karen
The Garden Gate http://garden-gate.prairienet.org =================================================================="If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need." ^and cats -- Cicero ==================================================================On the Web since 1994 Forbes Best of Web 2002
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How would you do this? fill the undersides with sand?

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In areas that experience severe winter cold, flagstone paths should be seated in at least 4 inches (6 is better) of fine crushed rock or very coarse sand to prevent frost heaving. Without this, you may find next spring that your path is considerably more uneven and unstable than it is now.
And while it may *look* good now, it will likely look not nearly as good after the winter has its way with it. And although I hate to suggest that you redo it, my experience as both a gardener and a professional landscape designer indicates that for maximum and long-term appeal and usability you avoid most shortcuts and take the recommended, tried and true approach.
Most building materials and/or landscape supply outfits provide instructions on how to design and install pathways. And there are countless DIY landscaping books that outline the same. And Stephen's suggestion to watch a little of the HGTV gardening how-to shows is a pretty good one - one can gather a lot of practical info from some of these shows.
pam - gardengal
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That's been my problem!! hehehehe I'm going to redo it.... thanks eveyone!
And Stephen's suggestion to watch a

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