Strawberry runners

Late with everything this year, so bought some strawberry plants.
2 Sequoia ever-bearing (I think) - standard here in So. Calif.
2 .June bearing. Nursery guy said not limited to June in this climate.
The Junies have runners galore. I was taught that one should cut off the r unners for plant to retain "strength", and that runners could be planted to get new plant.Or should I plant them far apart so runners can root themsel ves?
Nursery guy thought don't cut off runners. Does he know what he's talking about?
Been a few years since I grew strawberries. Rusty as to best practices.
EHow says: Strawberry growers often plant June-bearing strawberries in a m atted row system with about 4 feet of space between each row to allow runne rs to develop. Everbearing strawberries can grow effectively in a hill syst em with plants growing closer together with runners removed as they appear.
Whathethell is a "matted row system"??
TIA for any info.
HB
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Yes. Allow space for them to expand, spread the runners outwards from the crowns and after a year or two you will have 3-4 times as many plants.
D
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On Wednesday, May 28, 2014 10:59:05 PM UTC-7, David Hare-Scott wrote:

HB
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On Thursday, May 29, 2014 12:18:39 PM UTC-7, Higgs Boson wrote:

In the interests of saving time, here's a (possibly naive) question:
I spread small bark ground cover between plants. Usual reason: conserve water. With the drought that CA is facing, and with our horrendous water prices, this become even more important.
BUT: Will that stop runners from rooting? Or will they find their way through the ground cover? I don't want to find out months later that they can't root. Should I "engineer" bare ground patches where runner is heading? Anybody dealt with this dilemma?
TIA
HB
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On Tuesday, June 3, 2014 12:05:01 PM UTC-4, Higgs Boson wrote:

Why don't you "catch " the runners? Simply fill a small pot with soil, place it under the runner and pin the runner in place. Within a month or so it should be well rooted and can be clipped and planted where ever you want. Steve
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it will be an easier start for them if they are pinned down gently to be in contact with the soil under the mulch, but if the mulch is moist enough they'll root into that as well. i usually use a few small rocks (that won't crush the runner, but hold it down), some folks use pieces of wire or sticks, whatever works to keep the runner stable.
i recently pulled a few dozen rooted runners from last year that were growing in crushed limestone. not much of what you would call dirt for them to use, but they had roots down and were growing/flowering, they didn't miss a beat when put into the pots with soil. i'll see them this weekend and be able to tell how my brother is treating them at their new home.
today was the first day of ripe strawberries here. surprised me, as in many places they are still forming. it was out back in the unfenced strawberry patch on the plants that were most exposed to the sun and not crowded by other plants. some were ate right there after wiping the dirt mostly off (a little minerals in the diet...).
i'm trying to get everything weeded and planted this week so i won't have to do that and keep up with the strawberry harvest at the same time. today's remaining task is to get the squash seedlings out of the onion patch. i hate to do it as they look so healthy and green, but when i don't keep the onions bare they don't do much at all... so *snip* *snip* for them.
songbird
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Higgs Boson wrote:

The runners will probably get through and root themselves unless your bark is very thick. If you want to help them every few weeks go around and bury any that are running on the surface.
D
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On Wednesday, May 28, 2014 9:44:21 PM UTC-7, Higgs Boson wrote:

runners for plant to retain "strength", and that runners could be planted to get new plant.Or should I plant them far apart so runners can root thems elves?

g about?

matted row system with about 4 feet of space between each row to allow run ners to develop. Everbearing strawberries can grow effectively in a hill sy stem with plants growing closer together with runners removed as they appea r.

Thanks to all for useful suggestions!
HB
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On Tuesday, June 3, 2014 10:49:23 PM UTC-7, Higgs Boson wrote:

he runners for plant to retain "strength", and that runners could be plante d to get new plant.Or should I plant them far apart so runners can root the mselves?

ing about?

.

a matted row system with about 4 feet of space between each row to allow r unners to develop. Everbearing strawberries can grow effectively in a hill system with plants growing closer together with runners removed as they app ear.

Thanks to all for useful suggestions!

Followup:
Concerned because beaucoup runners but zip strawberries. Tried to ascertai n on-line whether allowing runners inhibist fruit production, but no clear reply. One sites suggested cutting off runners first year.
I guess I could set up an experiment, cutting off runners in Group A and al lowing them in Group B.
But I planted the damn things to get fruit NOW!
Any comment on runners vs. fruit?
HB
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