Strange pods dropping from my magnolia

I live in northern New York State (just north of Albany) and my magnolia (a M. soulangeana or M. stellata, I think; it has pink and white flowers in the spring) is dropping strange looking pods. They look like pickles or maybe the bumpy tip of an asparagus. They're about 2-3" long and 1/2" in diameter. I don't remember seeing any last year (my first year in this house). What are they?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

<http://lmgtfy.com/?q=magnolia+seed+pods
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


http://www.youtube.com/usnationalarchives

  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris Nelson wrote:

They are the pods. I advise you not to fall asleep near one...
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Best in the black and white movie.
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


http://www.youtube.com/usnationalarchives

  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/5/2009 10:51 AM, Chris Nelson wrote:

Having flowered, the magnolia then tries to form seeds. These are the "fruit" that contain the seeds.
Seed formation can stress a plant. Wood, leaves, and flowers are mostly carbohydrates, which are easily produced from water and carbon dioxide by the action of sunlight on leaves. Seeds, however, contain oils and proteins, which require a much more complicated plant chemistry to produce. The effort to produce seeds very often causes a plant to stop flowering. That is why we "deadhead" roses and other flowering plants.
I recommend that the immature pods be picked off the bush as soon as flowering is over. Just give them a little twist. This will promote more vigorous growth, leading to even more flowers next year.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Chris, My magnolia get these as well. For the seed pods to be this big, I'll bet your Magnolia is a large mature tree.
If you have turf under the tree, try not to leave the pods on the ground as they rot quickly and kill the grass around the pod for an inch or so.
Jon
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My neighbor planted an Magnolia tree along the property line and now I have leathery leaves to contend with. I compost everything, but these leaves are very rot resistant. I do not like it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a huge Southern Magnolia tree. I shred the leaves and grind the seed pods. After that, they both compost very well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.