Stone chippings - will they hurt my acid loving plants

I have a border in my garden with lots of rhodedendrons and azaleas. I have ill health now so i need to make the garden easier to maintain. There are lots of weeds at the moment, which i plan to have removed. Then some weed control fabric and stone chippings.
Cotswold stone chippings would be great, but probably would affect the ph too much. Is that right?
If it is, then what alternatives do i have? Are there most neutral or acid stones out there?
I dont really want to use bark or wood chippings because i dont like the look really.
thanks joel
--
snowathlete


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snowathlete wrote:

It would take a *very* long time as limestone is only slightly soluble and in the form of chips there is little surface area so the process will be slowed down. For agricultural use it is ground very fine, that is the surface area is millions of times more per kilo, and even then it takes months to start to work. I am not in a position to work the numbers but my guess is that if you lived to 100 the pH wouldn't change much if at all. The breakdown of organics that produce acids might be enough to counteract the effect and so there would be even less change or none.
Most stone is neutral for gardening purposes, limestone being an exception, ask your landscape supplier what they have.
David
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David Hare-Scott wrote: ...

and don't skimp on putting it down over the fabric. the deeper the layer the less weeds will sprout seeds in it. keep it clear of leaves/debris so that they do not rot and create organic matter in the rocks to sprout weeds. when mowing or weed whacking, edging, etc. make sure the mower is not blowing grass clippings all over the rocks. make your edge high enough to keep the mower from spraying pieces into the rocks. be careful when moving plants/pots/wheelbarrows to not dump them in the rocks.
that all said there will still be weeds from time to time, get them early and it saves a lot of work later.
songbird
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'David Hare-Scott[_2_ Wrote: > ;958901']snowathlete wrote:-

> and

>

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> counteract

> exception,

Thank you everyone for your replies so far; very helpful. Cotswold stone would be best for two reasons, 1. my local garden centre have BOGOF on 5 a back, which is a pretty good price. 2. my house is made of cotswold stone, so it would match up nicely.
But im still unsure. David's reply gives me hope, and if i washed it all before putting it down (to get rid of the dust that it comes with initially) then maybe it would be ok. But then other places ive seen online say to avoid it, so im still not sure. It would be dreadful if i lost all my favourite plants...
Granite is a nice idea, i could get some nice red granite perhaps, would cost abit more about 100 as apposed to 60 for the cotswold stone.
Dan, its reasuring that you used white marble and havent had any problems. I am leaning toward cotswold stone, but im still not sure...
--
snowathlete


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Costwald Stone is Calcium Carbonate. Same material as Marble.
My Rhodedendron is blooming right now. Looks great.
I wouldn't worry about the dust. White Marble comes with a lot of dust. It doesn't seem to matter.
If your house is Cotswold Stone then you've had water running off your house onto the ground for years.
--
Dan Espen

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That is a waste of time, I doubt anybody can stop him posting his slime, all you can do is block his posts so that you don't see them. Don't take it personally he will insult anybody at all and for no apparent reason. Most of his insults are framed about the supposed incompetence and foolishness of the poster he attacks yet he is a long way from reasonable competence himself. And yes he does tend to attack those he perceives as weak. A sad case of social pathology. Just add him to your killfile.
D
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Vell, he said, puffing on his meerschaum, and stroking his beard, what vee repress and try to deny vill come back to haunt us. Jung described the Shadow as, "everything that the subject refuses to acknowledge about himself and yet ist alvays thrusting itself upon him directly or indirectly". Shame, sexuality, rage, fear, weakness, jealousy, hurt and resentment can be shoved down into our unconscious, and when we meet someone who reminds us of our perceived shortcomings vee transfer our self loathing to them.
I presume that Brooklyn/Shelly was poorly toilet trained, vitch vould explain his shitty personality.
Time's up.
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I don't know what happens to the chemistry but I put white marble 3/8" chips down around rhodedendrons and azaleas more than 20 years ago.
The plants are still doing fine.
--
Dan Espen

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On 16/05/2012 17:39, snowathlete wrote:

I don't know if they come in exactly the colour you want, but have a look at granite chippings. They are a neutral stone.
--

Jeff

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On Thu, 17 May 2012 12:43:10 +0100, Jeff Layman

Only a moron would choose to fill a garden area with pebbles... normal folks spend much of their gardening efforts getting rid of stones and this dummy wants to add more stones... if you think you have work now just wait until you go chasing all those stones that no matter what will constantly migrate far and wide. Rhodies and azaleas are acid loving, they don't want alkaline stones... use a pine bark nugget mulch over the cloth.
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Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> writes:

Thanks Brooklyn, I can always count on you.
I put marble down over 20 years ago. I use lawn edging to keep the stones in place.
How many bags of pine bark do you think I would have used by now?
Plus this is right against the house. It looks good and I don't have anything splashing up on the foundation.
--
Dan Espen

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