Stella Dora Plants

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    I have stella dora plants that have quit blooming, turning brown and drooping. What should I do or what could be attacking them?
I have been treating other plants with a slug and snail killer.
Thanks
Bill Smith
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If you are referring to the daylily of that name, what you are experiencing is normal. They emerge in early spring and then bloom heavily for about a month in late spring to early summer. After the first bloom they tend to set seeds and decline. I try to remove the seeds as they develop. I put some fertilizer on them in the early spring and again after they bloom. Mine have started to boom again. The subsequent bloom is significantly more sparse than the initial bloom. The foliage starts to decline also. By fall, much of the foliage has turned brown. I have about thirty large clumps of them that line a walkway. They need to be divided but the job seem daunting and I would have to find new locations for the divisions. Maybe next year!
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There are no daylilies with that name.

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Yes, I know.
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I am not speaking of day lilies. I know that they have a short bloom period. The ones I mean are in bloom all summer and a smaller plant. They are referred to as Stella Dora. They have yellow flowers and almost look like a smaller version of the common daylily.
wrote:

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The correct name is "Stella D'Oro", you wing nut.

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The stella dora is not a daylily. It looks like a smaller version of the daylily and is supposed to bloom all summer.
Annette
On Sat, 31 Jul 2004 04:21:49 GMT, "Cereus-validus"

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The correct name is "Stella D'Oro", you wing nut, and it is very much a Hemerocallis hybrid.
Do your homework, then get back to us when you know what you are talking about.

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I know what a daylily is. What I am referring to is the smaller version of the same type of plant. It is supposed to bloom all summer. It looks very much like the larger daylily. I know the larger one only blooms for a couple of weeks and dies off. Actually any version of this plant is very easy to transplant. Very hardy.
Annette
wrote:

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If you are talking about this plant, it IS a daylily: http://plantsdatabase.com/go/2653 /
It is a re-blooming variety. The hype says that it blooms all summer. I suppose it does is some yard somewhere. It is used by the tens of thousands in landscapes here in SW Ohio. It blooms heavily for about three week with a few flower before and following the primary bloom. That extend the three weeks to four or five. It rests for about three weeks and then you will see sporadic flowers for the rest of the summer. If you deadhead, the re-blooming will be a little heavier. Daylilies tend to decline after they bloom and this one in no exception. You simply can't believe everything printed on nursery labels. I saw a tag on Oenothera fruticosa today that said it boomed all summer - and it doesn't.
You can see a small sample of the ones that I have in the link below. http://groups.msn.com/laurelridgegardens/06162001.msnw?action=ShowPhoto&PhotoIDG1 http://groups.msn.com/laurelridgegardens/june23.msnw?action=ShowPhoto&PhotoIDB2 http://groups.msn.com/laurelridgegardens/june23.msnw?action=ShowPhoto&PhotoIDB5
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Thanks for the information and websites which were very helpful. I feel better now about my plants. Many of my replies were sarcastic, so I happy to receive your useful infor. Thanks again.
Annette
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There are daylilies that are very short with small flowers. They are not all tall like the ditch lily. I could not find any other perennial with the name Stella Dora. You have a daylily, Stella De Oro.
The reason your Stella De Oro is not blooming properly is because the garden centers sell tissue cultured plants marked as Stella De Oro. Tissue cultured plants are not always an exact clone of its famous parent and it does not perform well. Also there are a lot of Stella De Oro look alikes that are not the true Stella De Oro, not even tissue cultured from the true Stella. If I were you I would take the plant back to the garden center where you got it and demand my money back. They are charging too much for that plant as it is. I sell daylilies. The most frequent question I get is asking why their Stella De Oro does not bloom like others they have seen. The problem seems to be getting worse. Probably because there are so many of the so called Stella De Oro in the garden centers.
Also even the true Stella De Oro does not bloom all summer. It reblooms a little, some zones more than others. When it gets to be a huge clump there are so many scapes and flowers it takes a long time for the first bloom to bloom out.
Also the Stella owner should realize they need to remove those seed pods that form. The seed pods are the round pumpkin like things that form on the end of the scapes after the bloom is finished. Any plant that goes to seed will stop blooming. So after the first bloom is finished, remove the scapes and seed pods right away. Keep your Stella De Oro watered well, and it should bloom better for you if you do not have one of the fake Stella's.
Wil
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I bought the original plants two years ago, divided them in the Fall and perhaps that is what is also part of my problem. I have trimmed them back, fertilized them and will wait to see what happens. Thanks so much for the information.
Annette
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Try "Stella D'Oro" Daylilies instead.

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You are probably correct with the spelling but I need to know what to do for the problem.
Annette
On Sat, 31 Jul 2004 04:20:36 GMT, "Cereus-validus"

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On Sun, 01 Aug 2004 01:55:22 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Bill Smith) wrote:

As Vox said, it's NOT A PROBLEM. It's the normal course of events for even a so-called repeat-bloom hemerocallis.
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On 8/1/04 9:38 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

And again, It is not a problem!
Cheryl
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Another thing, don't use Miracle Grow on daylilies. It is too high in Nitrogen [the first number on the formula]. Use a fertilizer with a low first number such as 6-10-10, or 5-12-10. If you use a high nitrogen fertilizer on daylilies you will get all green foliage and few bloom.
Wil
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Standard all-purpose Miracle Grow is 15-30-15 plus micronutrients. If you have this formulation you can make it 'low-nitrogen' by using less of the crystals in a given volume of water. The recommended usage rate is 1 tablespoon per gallon of water, but if you simply reduce the amount to 1 teaspoon per gallon of water you will effectively have a 5-10-5 formulation, without having to buy another fertilizer.
Miracle Grow is also formulated as a 'bloom booster'. That ratio of macronutrients is 10-52-10, and also includes micronutrients. You can effectively reduce the nitrogen (and other components) by half by using 1 tablespoon in 2 gallons of water, instead of the recommended 1 tablespoon in 1 gallon of water.
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Yes indeed, thanks for pointing this out. At one time it seems that Miracle Grow was a different formula with a higher nitrogen ratio. I may be wrong about that. I know Osmocote comes in different ratio forumlas so the box should be read to know exactly what ratio of Nitrogen-phosphorus-potash [N-P-K] is in the particular fertilizer.
Also there is a time to use a high nitrogen fertilizer. I do use it if foliage looks sluggish. However, too many home gardeners seem to think if a little Miracle grow is good then more will cure all plant problems or uses it at the wrong time.
Wil
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