Steer compost in garden

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There is a bark place down the road that sells mushroom compost and steer compost. Is this stuff good for the garden? Can I use it like compost and heap it on the ground around plants and trees?
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I have a truckload of the stuff sitting out front. It looks like slightly dried and aged steer manure, I'm not sure how much it's been "composted". I'm guessing it might be a bit hot and should be used sparingly. Anyone have experience with this stuff?

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Dump it into a pyramid shaped pile. Add two steer horns and cover with a tarp. Remove in 3 .3 decades and spread it about . The horns should be filled with sand.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_Steiner>
Na just spread the shit about. You seem to be well on your way.
Bill who has a horn in water in my basement for about 30 years.
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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Take a look at http://www.ext.colostate.edu/Pubs/foodnut/09369.html You probably don't want to use it on anything that you'll be harvesting in the next three months, if it hasn't been commercially composted, i.e. done in very large lots to generate the heat needed to kill pathogens.
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Billy
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Sunlight and soil biota are also good destroyers of pathogens. http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/livestock/publicconcerns/cwa01s11.html
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In article

If given 3 - 4 months of warm summer days ;-)
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Billy
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Manure should be at least six months old before use. By mushroom compost, do you mean the medium that the mushrooms grow in? If so, that is probably horse manure and was sterilized before it was used for mushrooms (good to go). These are fertilizers, if I read you properly, a source of nitrogen for the plants, not what gardeners usually think of as mulch, which is usually worm food.
Like mulch, leave six foot radius around the tree clear, if you plan to feed them. Most plants could do well with a side dressing about now.
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wrote:

It is aged, you can tell by looking at it, but there is no telling how long it was aged. It has a fairly pleasant odor (for manure, that is) which would indicate some aging. I think I'll go sparingly just in case...hate to fry my plants with hot manure.
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wrote:

PS - it's definitely not mulch. This is plain old somewhat aged cow poop.
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Then use it now and dont' let the nutrients escape into the ground in a non useful place. Don't put it around the base of lettuce or parsley but anything that will be harvested from above the level of the poop will love it as will your worms.
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I disagree strongly with this. I use manure pretty fresh and always have. It just depends on where you use it.
I think that the taboos about manure stem from old books (mostly from Europe) which all talk about "aged manure". I suspect that most people believe that without ever having tried it really fresh.
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wrote:

I agree. I live in the midst of cattle country and we run horses as well. Manure from either can be used within a few weeks of date of plop when it has dried somewhat.
Manure from birds (chickens, turkeys etc) is another matter altogether as the content of nutrients is much higher. It must be diluted and/or composted and/or aged before use. I prefer diluting and composting in with other plant material as these help to retain the nutrients as just leaving it lying in a heap will allow the soluble nutrients (especially nitrogen compounds) to leach away. This usually results in great growth of grass downslope from the pile which may not be what you want.
As for the neccesity of hot composting and sterilizing I think the risk of picking up a pathogen from the manure of a herbivore is greatly over estimated. Sure there are E.Coli and other pathogens that can live in humans in their guts but we all live in a microbiological soup. The air, the water and every object we touch is covered in microbes by the gazillion. Living isn't something you can do sterile.
There are a great many people in the western world who live in big cities who are horrified at the thought of anything that has come out of the arse of a living creature. [I always knew that a boiled egg is the work of the devil] I have had people ask me "where do the horses go to the bathroom?" When I replied "where ever they please" they were horrified.
You have only to look at the vast market for fancy surface cleansers, coloured stuff to put down your toilet etc, most of which is entirely pointless, to see how this fear is reinforced by vested interests. Much of this squeamishness is based on the fear that one spot of fecal matter on ones skin will automatically result in an illness. You wash before eating don't you? You have an immune system don't you? But you are a bad parent whose children ought be taken away if your whole bathroom isn't sprayed with Zeppo Ultraclean daily.
I would say changing the dirty nappy of an infant is far more dangerous (not to mention unpleasant) than spreading barrows full of not fully composted cow manure.
David
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wrote:

Kinda confusing, the FDA and other naysayers of animal poop. The last tainted spinach thing, that found the couple of rows where it was located in a farm in California. Uphill from there, cattle graze. They heavily implied the cow manure during heavy rain was the culprit. But, didn't come out and say it was for sure. Seems more rhetoric and guessing, than science to me.
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"Dioclese" <NONE> wrote:

A surmise perhaps, but not without foundation or precedent. http://www.csiss.org/classics/content/8
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Keep the feces out of the water. Feces on the land that is breaking down not the problem. I have had many tons of chicken feces spread about here in the past along with with wood chip it sort of invites a vitality. I would not like it in my water supply . So what is the problem? Perhaps long times of produce sitting about and driven a few thousand miles. The labels in my supermarket suggest when to sell by but not when they arrived. Then misted to suggest fresh.
Bill
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My conclusion is that the FDA simply does not really know the actual source of E-coli in recent grocery produce problems. And, they will probably never will now, or, in such future outbreaks.
Commonly, the workers in the grocery produce department place the newly arrived stuff in the rear of the bin, the best they can.
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Dave

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???? I must have missed any reference to humanure in the garden. I wouldn't recommend it even though the Chinese have done it for 40 centuries.
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Shirley (couldn't resist) you wouldn't drink water that was fresh run-off from a cow pasture. We be talking shit here, I don't care what animal it came out of. Don't try to obscure the issue with your wiley Australian pas-de-deux.
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Shirley, who the hell is Shirley?
(couldn't resist) you wouldn't drink water that was fresh

Yep, we ARE talking shit here, but shit from cattle, not human shit.
I had assumed that as someone who continually tries to educate people to follow the organic path, you would understand that plants like cattle shit and in fact all animal shit. Human shit has no place in any domestic garden and no-one suggested drinking cattle shit.
Don't try to obscure the issue with your wiley

Well if by "Australian pas de deux" you mean that David and I are trying to get you to discuss this topic using logic and/or experience, then I guess I'd have to plead guilty. It sure beats doing the Texas two step.
We were talking cow shit so why suddenly introduce the topic of human shit?
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In article

Fran, you don't mind me calling you Fran, do you? Good. You don't keep up with cutting edge of American culture?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3rXK7NhWN8
explains all. Maybe I should have said Shelia but that doesn't have any resonance here.

Oh goodie, your back ;o) and brought your muscle with you:o( I was beginning to think that you had one too many Fosters and had gone to the waller for a nice lie down, now I find you've been prattling on about taxonomy (let's keep it to Chordata Tetrapoda), while I was talking about "enteric bacteria - rod-shaped Gram-negative bacteria; most occur normally or pathogenically in intestines of humans and other animals." The operative word here is "pathogenically".
I'm sure that plants do like doo, unless it's too much doo and fries them.
My point is, my painfully obtuse friend, is that the ingestion of green doo (be it sipped or chewed) may lead to predictable and avoidable consequences (you get sick). You should avoid root crops in conjunction with green doo. Leafy vegetables could be contaminated by rain splashing doo onto the plant, so either mulch them to eliminate splashing or don't grow them. Fruiting crops are probably safe; train any vining ones such as cucumbers or tomatoes onto a support so that the fruit is off the ground. Thoroughly wash any produce from the garden before eating it. Or you could just use aged manure and save yourself the trouble of the doo dos and the doo don'ts. Or you could doo it Bush's way and just irradiate it, doo and all, (yumm, yumm) and that would be the end of the problem (they say).

To put a finer point on it, I was stressing (1) the FACT that feces is a source for pathogenic organisms (see definition above) and (2) this concern abates after three to four months of dry warmth and sunshine. See: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/livestock/publicconcerns/cwa01s11.html
If you would simply engage that dormant organ under your hat, these conversations would go more quickly ;o))
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