Spindly Apricots

Hi there.
I'm growing Apricots from seed in France and now have 8 saplings about 2 ft high. They are very spindly and need support. Should I nip out the growing tip to encourage bushing?
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vomog


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On Fri, 10 Jun 2011 09:48:33 +0000, vomog

No and No... they don't need support, they will develop a stronger root system without support... and leave them to grow and soon they will begin to branch. It's much too soon to think about pruning. You're growing trees, not shrubs.
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Are they getting enough sun? Spindly often applied to plants that are not getting enough sun.
HB
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Higgs Boson;926465 Wrote: > On Jun 10, 2:48*am, vomog snipped-for-privacy@gardenbanter.co.uk wrote:-

> the

I've been growing them in a greenhouse. It's been very warm this spring, and certainly not lacking sun. Having had great luck with Peach from seed, I assumed the same for Apricots.
--
vomog


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On Sun, 12 Jun 2011 07:24:59 +0000, vomog

Stone fruit trees don't do very well in a greenhouse, they become stunted. In order to properly develop these trees need to be exposed to the elements, to temperature fluctuations and wind - without movement the root system won't attain full form, without contraction/expansion from alternating temperature neither will the above ground portion develop a strong structure. And those are not saplings... get those seedlings outdoors.
Tree Stages
1. Seed 2. Seedling: the above-ground part of the embryo that sprouts from the seed 3. Sapling: After the seedling reaches 1 m tall, and until it reaches 7 cm in stem diameter 4. Pole: young trees from 730 cm diameter 5. Mature tree: over 30 cm diameter, reproductive years begin 6. Old tree: dominate old growth forest; height growth slows greatly, with majority of productivity in seed production 7. Overmature: dieback and decay become common 8. Snag: standing dead wood 9. Log/debris: fallen dead wood
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