Spider wort

We recently moved into a new home and discovered that we have 4 spider wort plants. We never had these before and do not know how to care for them. When we moved in they were about 6" tall and now they are 24"tall. They have fallen over due to the weight. They continue to bloom beautiful blue flowers each morning and close at night. Come this fall what steps need to be taken. Do you cut them back or let nature take its course?
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Tom Mercer wrote:

Google for spiderwort and you will find lots of info.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
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"Spiderwort" is one word.

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cut them back and get yourself a garden grid and put over it. They'll grow back and thru the grid and bloom a second time. They're perennials. I've already cut mine back but if you don't they'll seed in other places in your yard or garden and you can lift them come spring when they come up to a different spot.
I have a dark blue one, a lighter blue one, once that is white with blush blue and blue stamens that had the name of Mystic Blue's, and a shocking magenta pink one that reseeded in a totally different spot where the original clump was.
Easy to take care of. Garden grids? Lowes or Home Depot for $3.19 each with three legs on the circle grid and green. Love those things.
madgardener up on the ridge, back in Fairy Holler, overlooking English Mountain in Eastern Tennessee zone 7, Sunset zone 36

them.
have
flowers
taken.
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Does Spiderwort like sun or shade ?

them.
have
flowers
taken.
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Yes, it all depends on which one you have in the large plant group.

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what's really good information, Cereus,something kinda neat is that I not only have the perennial varieties of Tradescanthia that are hardy for here, but I apparently have had Callisia fragrans which is a type of Tradescanthia or spiderwort for decades. And now have another houseplant, the fuzzy Brown spiderwort. <g> It's finally thriving in the heat and humidity on the north balcony with the other shade loving tropicals and what not. maddie
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The brown fuzzy one isn't a Tradescantia. Its Cyanotis kewensis from India.
http://albinopri.cool.ne.jp/leaf/database.cgi?equal2=Commelinaceae&equal3=Cyanotis&equal4=kewensis&tid=list3
Siderasis fuscata is brown and fuzzy but it is rosette plant not a creeper.
http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plants/Commelinaceae/Siderasis_fuscata.html
*******************
Tradescantia is strictly a New World genus.
Quite a few former Tradescantia are now Callisia or Gibasis, while former Zebrina, Setcreasea and Rhoeo are now back in Tradescantia.

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nope that's not it............Siderasis "Brown Spiderwort" Siderasis fuscata from Brazil. Pyrrheima Hassk. Commelinaceae. One sp. a per. herb, native to Brazil, sts. short, underground, leaves in a rosette, covered with dense rust-colored hairs, flowers in unpaired cincinni, subtended by small bracts, on short hairy peduncles from the crown, sepals and petals separate, stamens 6, filamenta glabrous, ovary hairy, 3 celled, each cell with 2 ovules. Fuscata (Lodd) H. E. Morre (pyrrheima fuscata) leaves elliptic, to 8 inches long 3 inches wide, dark green above with whitish center, purplish-red beneath, flowers nearly violet to rose-purple, about 1 inch across. Resembles the flowers of Tradescanthia, or Spiderwort.

not
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spider
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for
I also find that they like even moisture and don't do well in dry areas.
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Believe it or not, there are a few that grow well under relatively dry conditions. Tradescantia pallida, T.hirta, Callisia navicularis and Cyanotis somaliensis for example.

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Cyanotis
That's good to know. I have T. virginiana. I will check out the others.
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