Spider Plant

I have been growing my spider plant for the past year and it has don great... My only problem is is that it will not seem to produce babies does anyone have any suggestions/ideas that might help - Jitt ----------------------------------------------------------------------- posted via www.GardenBanter.co.uk
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What do you mean babies?
The adventitious plantlets are produced on the flower stems. It the plant isn't getting enough light to bloom, then you won't get plantlets. Do you fertilize it? How often do you water?

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Mine is loaded with babies, hangs in the sun with little water.
But I've never had luck with the babies. Do you stick them in dirt or water?
amy
Cereus-validus wrote:

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Amy D wrote:

Try keeping them on a sunny table or shelf and put each of the babies on the surface of some sandy potting soil "without" disconnecting from the mother plant until the runners have rooted. Just ring the parent plant with cut off styro cups and then when it's time to cut the cords, your plantlets will be in ready to go containers for plant sales, gifts or growing till they're ready for a larger home.
Dorothy


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Blues Ma wrote:

Thanks!
amy
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you could arc their stems back into 'mama's' pot. soon the babies wil have roots. now, give them their own pot (or other growing media - see below :-) )

if you let a slow-moving relative sleep nearby, baby 'spider-plants' will begin to thrive among your relative's nose-hairs.
http://www.scfirearms.org/psma/photos_files/psma32.jpg
---------- Chlorophytum, real observations and...
if the tops dry off or if a bird chews the tops off, they'll grow back.
in appropriate location, good tough ground cover with moderate irrigation and/or deeper shade (trade-off)
http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extnews/hortiscope/houseplnts/spider.htm
I tried tossing (true) seeds in pots, but never saw seedlings.
non-variegated cvs are toughest, but all cvs bleach in lots of sun.
http://goto.glocalnet.net/natal/amp/ampel.htm

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and put them up in the soil and use something like a bobby pin to secure each.

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Not babies. They are called plantlets.
Maybe the reason you never had luck propagating them is because you are babying them.
Wait until the plantlets have produced aerial roots then you can put them in water or moist soil. If you put them directly in soil, treat them like seedlings so that the roots can become established.

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Cereus-validus wrote:

The couple of them I tried had little roots and I stuck them in soil. I might not have kept them watered enough. I haven't attempted again....but several people have told me they will drop off and land in the flowerbed below and begin taking over. They haven't yet......
amy

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On Sat, 05 Jun 2004 21:55:52 GMT, Jitty

They produce runners when pot bound. Have patience.
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The plantlets are produced on flower stems NOT runners. The plants must flower first.
wrote:

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The plant is getting lots of light and yes i guess the word "babies" i not the correct term to use rather call them plantlets. anyways fertilize every 2 weeks using miracle grow. As for watering i have bee watering it every 3 to 5 days making sure that the soil is dry. All want is for this plant to start growing them.. ive been waitin patiently with no luck to-date.
Cereus-validus wrote:

Jitt ----------------------------------------------------------------------- posted via www.GardenBanter.co.uk
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On Sun, 06 Jun 2004 01:55:47 GMT, Jitty

Is the plant pot bound yet? They generally start putting out the runners when they feel a bit cramped I tended to just turn them back to root in the pot to make it bushier at first. Then I let them send out runners and dangle plantlets around until they get in the way at which time I'd whack them off and dump them in a glass of water or stuff them in a pot and heavily water them at first, then they'd root. Hard to stop them from rooting. They can take a lot of abuse.
Janice

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wrote:

probably boosted the odds a bit by giving them a bit of rooting hormone. Otherwise I just screwed them into a 4" pot and kept them moist for a while.
Jim
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Yes the plant is in a pot and has been for the past year it has grow farely large.
Jim Voege wrote:

Jitt ----------------------------------------------------------------------- posted via www.GardenBanter.co.uk
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Phisherman wrote:

I have made what I call 'spider bags' before which are cloth squares filled with seed starting medium which are loosely tied around the base of each plantlet. To moisten, I dunked each bag in water and gently squeezed out the excess and in no time, roots had developed inside the bag. I would detach the plantlet from the host, open the bags slowly and placed them in potting soil. Worked like a charm and it was funny looking at this spider plant with these 'bags' hanging on it. I was able to get quite a few new plants from the host plant too!
Buzzy :)
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"They produce runners when ..." no matter how you try to stop them :-)
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Do I need to repeat this statement every time because none of you are paying attention? Are your powers of observation really that bad?
Chlorophytum comosum (the so-called "Spider Plant") never produces runners. The plantlets are on the flower stems.
wrote:

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On Thu, 10 Jun 2004 01:24:37 GMT, "Cereus-validus"

And the spring display of Dogwoods isn't the "flowers." but if incorrect terminology becomes the accepted one, there's little point in saying "my Dogwood bracts were lovely this year." If the OP had written "...my spider plant doesn't produce flowers...," there'd have been a long thread of "what do you mean by flowers? MY spider plant just has little flowers along the runners/stems where the babies/plantlets form."
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