Spathiphyllum, Peace Lily

My youngest cat, now a year old, loves drinking from moving water; from faucets, hoses, pumped water in the bird bath etc. So, I, having this quite large Oriental gazed pot I found years ago at a garage sale, decided to make him a fountain in it. The only thing I could find to plant in it was Spathiphyllum. I got the job done and the cat loves it but it is not too stable. The only thing I could find to stabliize the pump hose was to stand a wire cookie cooler rack upright in the pot and wire the hose to it in the position suitable for the cat to reach it. The pot is quite deep and the only way I could keep the plants up high enough was to put one of them in a vase and set it on top of a jar and have the water high enough so that the water would flow into/outof the vase. (This plant I had washed all the soil from the roots hoping to grow it without soil.) The other plant I placed pot and all in a suitable ceramic bowl and set it on a jar so that the rim would be above water level but will have to water it individualy for now. The reason I did this is I wanted to see how the soiless plant would do and if works OK, will wash the soil from the other one. Then I placed a rock with some holes all the way through and put the hose through it to let the water come out of the rock.
the problem is, I need a more stable way to to set it up. The cat loves it, It is quite pretty, the spath is blooig and none of the hardware shows as the plants are quite full but I would like it to be more stable. would so much appreciate some advise. thanks in advane.--lee
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Yada, yada, yada.
What, are you writing a novel?
Just weigh down the pot by putting a big rock or two in the bottom.
The cat really couldn't care less what you do with the plant.

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well Cereus, it is refreshing to see that you are still your ole spit'n vinegar self! :) thanks for the responce even if it isn't what I wanted to hear. you are right; I do get carried away with explanations. --lee
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Aren't Peace Lilys poisonous? Just askin....
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i dunno but will Google it again under Peace Lilly.. couldn't find anything suggesting that they were when I googled before.-- lee
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If you were smart, you would Google "Spathiphyllum" instead.

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did both, but ran out of time before getting all possible info. Also My stamina isn't what it used to be and I sit here and fall asleep. 8?< --lee.
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wrote:

Yes, they have oxalate crystals, much like philodendrons, taros, dieffenbachias, other members on the Aurm family.
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Cabbages have oxalate crystals too.
So why aren't they poisonous?

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On Sat, 29 Oct 2005 23:22:43 GMT, "Cereus-validus-..........."

have glycosinolates which are metabolized to isothiocyanates, which are bad for people, but they don't have much.

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Yes, its dosage.
That's why most cabbages and their vegetable kin are thoroughly cooked before eating. Its to break down the oxalates.
Have you ever noticed that raw cabbage, when eaten, has that slight spicy hot taste. Particularly the cabbage "heart".
Nevermind talking about horse radish. Its full of all kinds of nasty chemicals that are borderline toxic to humans. That's what makes it so spicy hot it makes your eyes water!!!

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On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 02:29:42 GMT, "Cereus-validus-..........."

Yes, I've noticed that. I also liked to eat rhubarb leaves, even though I was told not to. I've eaten much more raw cabbage than cooked cabbage, it was almost a staple while I grew up.
Never died, at least yet, as far as I can tell.

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That's the thing, oxalates are irritants, like capsaicin, not deadly toxins.

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As a child my mother cooked in aluminum pots and everytime there was cabbage, I ended up in that 'little back room' throwing up. Also soups with a lot of tomatoes and fats. I could eat the raw cabbage but the heart burned my mouth. I only cook in stainless now and have no trouble with cabbage steamed or stirfried in olive oil. Think that oxalates and aluminum conflicted? 'course didn't know about that and still don't 'cept what i am learning from you folks and other groups. --lee
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Only if you are dumb enough to eat them.

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