Sowing Grass Under an Oak Tree

I need to sow grass on a large area under an oak tree. While I'm at it I want to over seed my entire front lawn. My question is what seeds, if any, are best for areas in both shaded areas and areas in full sun?
I know autumn is the best time for over seeding, but I don't want to wait that long. So other than waiting for fall, when would be the second best time for doing the job?
I live in North Central Texas which is in zone 8.
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 7 Feb 2007 15:37:24 -0600, "Freckles"

under a tree is better suited for mulch or shade-loving groundcover. Grasses really need some sun.

Spring. The seedlings will have to endure the harsh summer, so depending on draughts, you may need to plan another overseeding in the fall.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There is only one turfgrass which may survive and it's St. Augustine sod, nothing else will do well in the TX summers. I say to find a nice ground cover, drought tolerant, no grass. If you want to overseed your lawn, I need more information. Do you want green grass that needs mowing in winter? If so, use perennial rye, blue fescue, and any of the cool season grasses. For me, it's not worth all the watering expense.
On Wed, 7 Feb 2007 15:37:24 -0600, "Freckles"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Freckles wrote:

If you thin and raise the crown of the oak tree, St. Augustine may have a chance. But consider some groundcovers as said. Lamium, ajuga, whatever.
Carl
--
to reply, change ( .not) to ( .net)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 7 Feb 2007 15:37:24 -0600, "Freckles"

feeder roots are int eh top foot or two of soil, so excessive tilling under teh tree's canopy could do extensive damage. The root crown should be exposed to open air, so don't add soil to cover root flares (and excavate the crown if the builder or someone else already buried it). The critical root zone should be covered in a 3.5-inch layer of mulch, preferably organics like wood chips or bark. This zone is generally defined as a circle one foot in diameter per inch of trunk diameter (at breast height, 1 meter above grade). Often, grass lovers are unwilling to give up this much space; if that's you, any area of mulch is better than none. A foot or two from the trunk will at least give a little respite from the grass and remove the temptation to whack the tree with a string trimmer at mowing time. More is better.
www.treesaregood.com/treecare/mulching.aspx
Keith Babberney ISA Certified Arborist #TX-0236
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.