Solstice tree recommendation

I have a 7x7 square in a walled corner in which I would like to place a pine for future Winter Solstice decorating. The spot is mostely shady. I would like one with some noticeable pine fragrance and that I can keep below 10 feet in height without too much effort. Any suggestions?
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Blue wrote:

Get an artificial one.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
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Hanokii evergreen

pine
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<< I would like to place a pine for future Winter Solstice decorating. >><BR><BR>
Is that anything like a Chanuka Bush? Iris, Central NY, Zone 5a, Sunset Zone 40 "A tree never hits an automobile except in self defense." - Woody Allen
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Where do you live, please?
-- David J. Bockman, Fairfax, VA (USDA Hardiness Zone 7) email: snipped-for-privacy@beyondgardening.com http://beyondgardening.com/Albums

pine
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|> |> I have a 7x7 square in a walled corner in which I would like to place a pine |> for future Winter Solstice decorating. |> The spot is mostely shady. I would like one with some noticeable pine |> fragrance and that I can keep below 10 feet in height without too much |> effort. Any suggestions?
There are no conifers that like pruning, and only a few will tolerate it. Pines are among those that dislike it most. However, a yew (not actually a conifer) is entirely suitable provided that the soil is reasonably well drained and not too acid.
There are a few semi-dwarf upright conifers (not all that many), which might also do. But they would probably take ages to get to a reasonable size.
Not knowing where you are posting from, I won't suggest a species.
Regards, Nick Maclaren.
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I live in north Los Angeles county which I believe is Sunset magazine's zone 18. Wonder how a native tree like Pinon pine would do?
writes:

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|> |> I live in north Los Angeles county which I believe is Sunset magazine's zone |> 18. Wonder how a native tree like Pinon pine would do?
Probably OK, though it won't like the shade much. But you will have trouble with the problem that ANY conifer that is naturally small enough will also grow slowly, and none like being pruned down to size. Pines especially dislike it. You can clip several to make a hedgy plant, but they will not regrow from old wood, so you can't cut out bits that have got 'lumpy' and get any regrowth. I don't think that you can even clip pines, but I might be wrong.
The yews are shade tolerant, though they tend to like more moist conditions than you may have, and can be kept pruned to small sizes and any shape you like. I don't know which of the several plausible species would do best with you.
There are also some yew relatives (e.g. Torreya), which I know little about.
Regards, Nick Maclaren.
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On Wed, 02 Feb 2005 20:02:22 -0800, Blue wrote:

You maybe able to get away with a dwarf alberta spruce (Picea glauca `Conica'). Unsure where you live, but these trees are rather cheap around here. They do have spider mite issues though.
I would suggest that you go to a few different local nurseries and see what they have that meets your hight X width requirements. No matter what you select, you may still have issues with the low light levels. Good luck.
--
Yard Works Gardening Co.
http://www.ywgc.com
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Perhaps there are some dwarf cultivars of either Greek or Spanish Fir that would do well in your area (since they are native to Mediterrean countries). The species grow large eventually, but some firs are available in dwarf varieties. Firs are generally quite fragrant.

I
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Mugho Pine, Pinus mugo mugo
Emilie norcal
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The problem is getting it to 4' - especially in shade!
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juniper.
--
Charles

Does not play well with others.
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Now, why did nobody else (me included) think of that! Yes, a very good idea.
Regards, Nick Maclaren.
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Many thanks for the information received on this post. I have now a specific information on which to base my search. Blue

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