Soaker hose

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David Hare-Scott wrote:

Oops. That isn't right. Sydney Water does encourage them and puts backflow preventers in their meters, home garden systems don't have them though.
D
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"David Hare-Scott" wrote:

In the US you don't need a back flow valve for water coming from a hose bib, it already has a back flow valve from the main, the entire residence is protected... back flow valves are required for automatic irrigation systems because they are typically supplied directly from the water main before the residential back flow valve. But not knowing the codes where you live you may want to check... but water from a hose bib I seriously doubt needs a backflow valve... you've probably been using the hose bib to irrigate from since the house was built
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On Saturday, September 21, 2013 6:56:01 AM UTC-7, Brooklyn1 wrote:

This discussion has been VERY interesting! Just to be 1000% sure, I'll check out local regs, but I suspect you're right about the hose bib being protected. Tx to all.
HB
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Brooklyn1 wrote:

Not quite. My house and garden water supply are two enitirely different systems with different origins, different lines and different destinations.
In the days when I lived on municipal water I installed several watering systems attached to the mains (as did many neighbours) and none had a backflow valve nor was there any municipal regulation or talk of such in any of the literature.
D
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"Bob F" wrote:

Without saying where you live your statement is totally meaningless... and it's hose *bibs*... "bibbs" are a type of lettuce.

Again, without saying where you live and stipulating the type of water supply your statement is totally meaningless. In the US municipal water companies have a check valve at each meter, so their system is protected. But in the US many people have a private well (I do, I actually have two) but local zoning code requires a check valve at the point of entry to a residence, typically before the pressure tank (to protect the well). The reason for an anti-siphon check valve on an automatic irrigation system is to protect the residential water supply because typically such a system is attached directly to the water main entering the residence (directly after the meter), so as to draw from the largest diameter pipe for maximum volume and pressure. A hose bib is already protected the same as the spigot at your kitchen sink. The only time a check valve may be necessary at a hose bib is if the irrigation system attached to the hose bib is below ground, ie. buried soaker hose, or directly on the ground, but unnecessary when using a garden hose in the usual manner. Heating systems in the US with hot water boilers are required by code to have a check valve at the boiler's supply, because typically the system contains anti freeze. Whether a check valve is required depends on usage, for example an aquarium aeration compressor needs a check valve to protect the pump, same as folks who have a swimming pool, and many other usages... but a hose bib no more needs a check valve than your kitchen sink spigot. Most folks who use soaker hoses do attach a check valve between the bib and the soaker hose... most attach a timer, many timers do contain a check valve, some will add fertilizer, some contain a pressure regulator... a pressure regulator is a good idea for protecting the integrity of the soaker hose... a sediment filter is recommended as well to prevent the soaker hose pores from clogging over time... the biggest detriment to saoker hoses is hard water, if one has hard water I don't recommend soaker hoses.
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