snap dragons still snapping

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It was 25 degrees couple days ago, but plants are still green and 5 flowers on a couple. Tomato plants have given up the ghost, but snap dragons are still hanging tough. Is that normal?
btw, my sister showed me why they have that name. Asked 3 or 4 other relatives, and none of them knew either till she showed them.
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On 11/15/2013 4:19 PM, Gus Overton wrote:

25 is pretty hot. I would have thought they would thrive on that temp. They usually do well over 15 degrees in our garden. I find they wilt once you reach 30 degrees or the middle of July heat.
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Hench wrote:

I wonder if you two are talking about degrees C, degrees F or one of each.......
D
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On Saturday, November 16, 2013 6:04:08 PM UTC-5, David Hare-Scott

Only use US American degrees where I live.
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Gus Overton wrote:

There is no such scale and this is not where you live but an international forum. It is peculiar to the USA that so many citizens think what they do is normal, even universal, but in fact it is not so. Just as we need to allow for differences in gardening custom ( eg, naming plants such as pumpkins) I think being explicit about measurements is useful for good communications.
D
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On 11/16/2013 8:59 PM, David Hare-Scott wrote:

If the OP would have typed the letter F, then i would have realised.
Of course I run into this problem on the cooking forums too.
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On Sunday, November 17, 2013 7:00:43 AM UTC-5, Hench wrote:

I almost did, tbh, but thought it was obvious, given the time of year. Sorry. Seems like most people here are in the States or Northern Hemisphere from posts I've seen.
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On Saturday, November 16, 2013 5:59:10 PM UTC-8, David Hare-Scott wrote:

Many years ago the US made a half-assed attempt to join the metric world. Road signs were po$ted with mile$ and kilometer$. Of course people took the easy way out and the experiment faded away.
OZ did the right thing; went cold turkey overnight. The adults seem to have managed to survive with metric, and the kids never knew anything else.
I have always understood that the US pays a trade penalty with the rest of the (metric) world for labeling in English.
Maybe this has been remedied. Anybody know?
HB
HB
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On Sunday, November 17, 2013 11:21:10 AM UTC-5, Higgs Boson wrote:

mechanics have to have two sets of tools. I remember the metric road signs, but don't remember seeing one in years... Oddly, 10K races are popular in the US.
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Well, 'He who plays with old British Sports Cars' and to whom I've been married for more than 4 decades, mutters on about a larger range of tools than just Metric and Imperial.
IIRC those tools names include Whitworth, BSF, Imperial, Metric and also I think I recall BA???
I have no idea what most of those mean. I just mutter 'Yes Dear' when he goes on about them just as I do now when he talks of 'preselector gear boxes'. The sad thing is that I do know what a preselector gearbox does and how to use one.
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Apparently in the USA metric is approved but not compulsory (or traditional measures are not forbidden) consequently there is no money available for conversion and education costs so nothing is done.

Correct. It wasn't really such a big deal.
D
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David Hare-Scott wrote: ...

it is taught in the schools and it appears on all packages that i've seen in recent years along with the other measurements.
songbird
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On Sunday, November 17, 2013 4:58:21 PM UTC-8, songbird wrote:

onal

r

Y'see, Songie, that's eggzactly what I was on about -- the two sets of meas urements. I cited the awful, expensive, humiliating debacle of the Mars sh ot as an example of potential -- in the case of the Mars weather shot -- AC TUAL damage when 2 sets of measurements try to exist side by side.
Always on the search for a conspiracy <g> I thought of the wonderful Latin saying -- one of the half-dozen I remember -- "cui bono" = who profits? Who DOES profit by retaining the anachronistic English measurement (a yard is the distance from King John's nose to his outstretched hand) ?

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Higgs Boson wrote:

USA traditional measure is not even the same as English, your volume measures are not the same as Imperial. But all measures are to some extent arbitrary, the yard may have been the distance from nose to finger but the metre was the distance between two lines scratched on a platinum bar that were supposed to be a fraction of the distance from Paris to the north pole but wasn't. Neither are specified that way today. It isn't the old standards that are the problem, the key difference is that the divisions and multiples in traditional measure are neither consistent nor decimal.
I doubt that anybody profits directly but there are political considerations. The issue is whether the national government will spend politial capital making it happen. Clearly no recent President or Congress has thought it worth their while in the context of a citizenry who distrust their leaders and in some cases do not want an effective central government at all.
I can see the Tea Party rousing the Right to resist such an unwarranted incursion upon personal freedom... "how dare they try to tell us how to measure stuff by some weird European way.....". The fact that traditional measures are the weird ones and that other than one or two small backwaters the USA is the only country to resist metrification has escaped their notice.
D
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On Sunday, November 17, 2013 4:58:21 PM UTC-8, songbird wrote:

Y'see, Songie, that's eggzactly what I was on about -- the two sets of measurements. I cited the awful, expensive, humiliating debacle of the Mars shot as an example of potential -- in the case of the Mars weather shot -- ACTUAL damage when 2 sets of measurements try to exist side by side.
Always on the search for a conspiracy <g> I thought of the wonderful Latin saying -- one of the half-dozen I remember -- "cui bono" = who profits? Who DOES profit by retaining the anachronistic English measurement (a yard is the distance from King John's nose to his outstretched hand) ? ------------------------------------------ But Higgs, the US doesn't even stick consistently to 'English' (which is really called 'Imperial') meausres.
It does stick with those measures for ft and inches (but then why would anyone have changed that? mewonders) but not with fluids.
US pints are short by 4 ounces because an Imperial Pint is 20 ounces. I once had an argument with an American woman online who kept insisting that 'a pints a pint the world around'. For some reason she would neither believe me when I stated that 20 ounces was more the norm for a pint outside the US and nor would the silly woman use google. That's usenet though........
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Nope. I now do conversions form Imperial to metric very easily. Perhaps that is due to having made furniture for a hobby for a while.
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On 11/16/2013 6:04 PM, David Hare-Scott wrote:

I use the Cecilius system. Maybe the OP is using the F system. I don't know anything about that system. Is 25 in the F system hot?
I thought 25 Cecilius was good for snap dragons.
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On Saturday, November 16, 2013 4:05:03 PM UTC-8, Hench wrote:

That's how they lost Mars Climate Orbiter. One side was using English and the other was using metric. Unforgivable! Who the hell was watching the store!
http://www.space.com/news/mco_report-b_991110.html
HB
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Hench wrote:

It's below freezing which is 32 degrees F. You need to allow for those primitives who don't know about Celcius or you are in fact typing past each other.

probably
D
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If you type into Google:
25c in f
Google returns 77F.
Seemed pretty obvious to me that 25F would be no good for any plant.
Pretty sure I learned about squeezing a snap dragon to make it open and close before age 10.
That's 10 years.
--
Dan Espen

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