Slugs eating our annuals

We recently planted a few 4" high annuals in our home garden in Western Washington near Olympia. Within a couple of nights, some of them were stripped completed of their flowers and leaves. Our neighbor informed us that the culprits are slugs and showed us the silvery trail that they leave behind. She suggested that we use poison or else choose plants that they don't like to eat. What are some colorful annuals (or even perenials) that won't attract the slugs? Thanks for any advice.
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The slug bait suggested by my nursery is called THAT'S IT.
It does seem to work better than the usual brands.
Before giving up on your existing plants, give it a try.
BTW - Which annuals did you plant; just curious.
Good luck.
--
Aspasia

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If you don't mind cleaning up slugs. Get some beer. (No, I'm not kidding it works) Put the beer in some throw away plastic bowls. Put one bowl close to the each group of flowers.
That above is just a temporary solution.
Scott's Grub x does a good job-be careful don't use too much.
Also, keep children and pets away after your spread this stuff
Scott's last longer than beer but the slugs could still come back the next year or sooner
Greg Ro
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You need to bury the bowls enough so the slugs can climb into the bowls. Traps containing beer or other fermenting food are popular. You can purchase commercially available slug traps or make your own. Sink jars, cans, pans or similar containers into the ground so the top is level with the ground (some commercially available traps are placed on the ground). Pour beer or a water and yeast mixture (one teaspoon of yeast to three ounces of water) or similar fermenting liquid into the container. Slugs are attracted to the odors, fall in and drown.
Diatomaceous earth (tiny fossilized skeletons of ancient aquatic diatoms) or sharp sand is moderately effective as a slug barrier. When slugs come in contact with diatomaceous earth or sharp sand, it is abrasive to their skin. Diatomaceous earth is most effective when used in dry conditions and has little effect when it absorbs moisture.
--
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Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
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Place the traps a good 1/4-3/8 inch above the grounds surface. That way you do not drown the beetles which are predacious on slugs. Slugs have no problem climbing over . In addition go out and hand pick with a flashlight whenever time allows.
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tenplay Wrote:

In the UK, a company called Growing Success has launched a Slug Pelle based on Ferrous Phosphate, which is approved as Organic, being n threat to friendly birds, frogs , etc.
On a lighter note, a magazine suggested borrowing a Kitchen Food Mixer but not the wife's, to turn drowned slugs and snails into a rar cocktail! Apparently, spreading this on the flower beds is a deterren to other slugs!
A useful tip is to ensure the lid is fixed tightly!!!
Brian Corbet
-- Brian Corbett
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how about just picking them off. slimy yes, but effective.

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