Silver Leaf Vine

I have this very annoying vine that is growing all through my garden which I can't kill. I have tried a vew different weed killers and none of them are working.... it kills the weed, but within a 1-2 weeks the vine comes up again and again multiple times....
I tried digging for the bulb and found a few but a lot I didn't find.... when I try to dig and dig it breaks in goes through a small crack in a rock, then thats as far as I get.... I found a few... they are huge... one was a bit smaller than a tennis ball, another few golf ball sizes... But there must be HEAPS more of these nasty thing under the dirt but I can't kill them.... anyone got any magic cures on how to kill the bulbs? I spray poison every week which doesn't make much difference...
My mum took one of the bulbs home and tried to grow it in a pot... after a couple of months or more... her's only grew about 20cm.... mine do that at least in 2 weeks.... She was just interested to see it grow elsewhere... and try to find out what it is... She saw something similar it at a nursery and it was called a "Silver Leaf Vine"..
I have been able to find very little information about this on the internet, but I'm despritye to get rid of it... Any got any suggestions?
Thanks Glen
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Glen C wrote:

Hot afternoon, cut stems towards growing tip and insert into a small container of straight roundup which you tie on. Works a wonder as the plant keeps sucking roundup down into the roots.
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Care to explain this a bit better? I'm curious.
Jen
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Jen wrote:

Plants are pumping more fluids to and from the leaves on hot days. So when you cut the tip off a vine and immediately stick it into a small container of roundup, it starts sucking the stuff back into the plant, With a little luck it will reach the roots before it starts killing off the plant.
Worked a treat on a neighbours vine that kept invading my garden shed and he declined to trim. Shed locaion in back corner meant that I couldn't get in there either (yes, the fence had been relocated).
I have also found that scrapping vine stems and painting (small artists paint brush) roundupo will sicken a lot of plants.
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hmmm Interesting :) I'll give that a go! I did try just cutting the top off and spraying the naked cut (as opposed to just staying the leaves). BUt yeah your suggestion might work :)
Thanks

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Glen C wrote:

We kill off a lot of roots for privet and such by cutting the stem/trunk and painting stump(small 1/2" paintbrush) or cut vines (small artists brush).
I used the bottle of roundup on a vine that kept reoccuring. Figured that we were not getting enough poison back into the roots but the cut and paint method.
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If it's the one I'm thinking of, with leaves like crinkled sorrel leaves, then getting the tuber is only half the problem. You need to find the nearby source of the seeds, maybe a neglected garden or neighbouring wall. This vine produces a prodigous number of seeds, they hang by the thousands in decorative garlands. The young seedlings are very easy to pull out, before the 6 leaf stage when they have yet to develop their tuber.
I expect that constant spraying of emergent leaves will eventually kill off the tuber.
--
John Savage (my news address is not valid for email)

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