*sigh* Butterfly Bushes

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I tend to agree... except for the mint. I won't go into my mint war because most people have been there ;) I do like mint in a pot but the people that lived here before us allowed mint to take over.
Michael
--
“…real foodies should just give over to the experience of eating and let
the experience take them away. No questions. No expectations. No analysis.”
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On Tue, 17 Apr 2007 11:46:37 +0000 (UTC), FragileWarrior

Simply, the definition of a weed is a plant out of place. My entire back garden is designed for wildlife, so to someone elses eye would be very messy. Well, that's what nature does. I don't let invasive species which are non-native to take over. I remove those when I can.
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In that case you should move to where ever it is that they are native.
--
Travis in Shoreline Washington


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Nah. I think I'll move to where you are and spread seeds willy nilly just to annoy you. :)
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"Definition of weed; a plant in the wrong place"...familiar joke saying among Brit gardeners.

Very often, in their native habitat, weed plants are part of an ecosystem where there is some natural control; hungry insects, or animals, or climate Buddliea is not a native species here and there's nothing here to control it naturally.
Usually invasive plants are removed, not for being plentiful, but because they would smother cultivated crops or cause a some expensive hazard.

They are beautidul, on some bit of waste land not being used for anything else. But these are big weeds. In a single summer season, a young plant can grow 7 ft in all directions and unchecked, they'll go to 20 ft high in a couple of years. On railway embankments, they can spread so thickly they become a fire hazard or an obstruction to railway workers.If buddliea self-seeds into a tiny crack in paving or the stone or brick walls of a house, the rapidly expanding roots and trunk will soon widen that tiny crack into a bigger one, letting in rain and frost, breaking up paving, concrete and mortar, causing structural damage, loosening chimney stacks etc. . It's quite common here to see buddleia growing several storeys up on a neglected building, chimney stack , roof, or rain gutter. Eventually the weight of the plant, or the wind tugging it, could bring down gutters, masonry blocks etc.
Janet (Scotland)
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wrote:

They may be beautiful but invasives displace native vegatation.
--
Travis in Shoreline Washington


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On Tue, 17 Apr 2007 17:00:29 GMT, "Travis M."
One year I tried a variegated form called 'Harlequin' and it immediately became the catch crop for spider mites. I pulled them out the following year and don't have any. I use zinnia, echinacea, passiflora, morning glory, datura and many others for the butterflies and moths. Maybe it's just too hot in summer here?
Is there a form anyone knows of which withstands 100 degrees for about 4 months a year?
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On 4/17/07 1:14 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

I'd try the species or there is a form I've seen in Tony Avent's catalog that is supposedly really heat hardy.
Cheryl
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On Tue, 17 Apr 2007 13:39:29 -0400, Cheryl Isaak

I'll take a look. Around here we have the elite garden centers. Heaven forbid the species is sold. They must have all these varieties which drop dead mid-June. There is not one plant in my garden anywhere which is not for one or another animal or insect. So, I don't really need another plant. I have 20 flats of seeds I've sown and now what do I do with them? :)
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On 4/17/07 10:36 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

You'll love his site. Worst come to worst, I'll send you seeds from my species and you can try those.
C
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wrote:

Actually this is not about Travis not liking Butterfly bush and/or being upset if they reseed in his yard. Butterfly bush is one of a great number of Exotic pest plants here in the West. In WA its BF Bush, here in Nor Calif. Broom is a pest in the foothills of the Sierra/Cascade ranges, Pampas Grass is taking over the North Coast and Arundo is destroying creek habitat. ( if you live in a more urbanized/agricultural state it is difficult to imagine the damage to wild lands and wilderness areas) These plants have no insect pests to keep them in check and the climate allows them to grow rapidly. As a result, they crowd out native plants, thereby reducing not only the number of plants, but also the foods available to native mammals, birds, and fish. Some, like broom and pampas grass, are a very dangerous wildfire hazard. Eradication is extremely difficult, especially when nurseries continue to sell these plants to gardeners who aren't aware of the problems these plants create. Emilie NorCal
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wrote:

Broom is a problem here also.
--
Travis in Shoreline Washington


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Hmmmm... Travis, where are you located? I wonder if there is a species of butterfly bush I'm not aware of. I've never had one that became invasive. Sure, mine get really big if not kept in check but never have they become invasive. Now my bee balm is invasive.
Michael
--
“…real foodies should just give over to the experience of eating and let
the experience take them away. No questions. No expectations. No analysis.”
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Did you read my whole post including my .sig?
--
Travis in Shoreline Washington


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Obviously that sig thingy doesn't work.
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On Tue, 17 Apr 2007 01:32:36 +0000 (UTC), FragileWarrior
I have my newsreader set to eliminate them. I personally find these long sigs with obnoxious quotes to be rather self-indulgent and boring.
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wrote:

He doesn't have a long one but I have my brain set to ignore them. I can't understand why he simply can't answer the question since he's the one asking for help.
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wrote:

Actually dear, *I* am the one that asked for help. And thanks to you good folks I've gotten it. Now f'loons are invasive <EG>.
Michael
--
“…real foodies should just give over to the experience of eating and let
the experience take them away. No questions. No expectations. No analysis.”
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wrote:

I shoulda known it was you starting all this trouble. :::shake fist at Michael:::
<gardening folks can stop reading here. The next part is only for someone who really, really, REALLY loves horses>
Hey, I had a mini with diarrhea the other day. EWWWWW EWWW EWWWW. That was gross. Do you know that Tractor Supply sells 32 oz of the equine equivalent of Kaopectate for $6?? Try shoving a cup of that into a horses mouth every three hours.
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On Tue, 17 Apr 2007 12:48:43 +0000 (UTC), FragileWarrior

How about putting it in a vat with apples and carrots? Maybe the horse will eat it freely. I have to use those methods with our parrot when she had digestive problems.
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