Shredding & blowing peat moss on lawn?

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She said "8000 sq feet", so new lawn or not, she's considering a major expenditure for a substance that will be relatively ineffective.
Another thought: She made no mention of having gotten a soil test. If she has soil with too much clay, peat moss would only make matters worse.
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Why do you say that? Further conversations with this individual?
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The kid probably gives more honest and better advice.
Jim Carlock Post replies to the group. "Clean your finger before you point at my spots." Benjamin Franklin
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wrote :

go and check out a waste exchange programme is one exists in your area. Here is a local example of polypropylene to cover 900 square metres. http://www.rmf.org.nz/terranova/weedmats /

the answers you have got thus far is that it is a daft idea and will not work. More than that using enough peat moss to cover an 8000ft lot is a shit load of peat moss and will cost a shit load of money for the moss itself. Even more than that, peat moss takes time to develop and using it as a grass starter is a waste of a resource in my opinion. The only possible way you could use peat moss I can see is to lay long rolls, like laying carpet, of it across the earth. It will be a hassle to continually lift to check the growth of your grass however and roll off when the grass starts to come up. You will not be able to leave the peat moss down as it will simply starve your grass of light. Result, dead grass. No, forget the peat moss, its a bad idea because it most likely won't work as you envisage it, will be a hassle spread any other effective way, will cost too much money that way and is a waste of a natural resource. Find a free, or cheap, source of material that you can stake down over your new seedlings. Leave it down until germination and then lift up to allow the sun in. Its around if you look for it.
rob
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You obviously didn't have a question. You had a bad idea and you wanted other people to agree with it. That's not happening, so maybe you're one of those people who only recognizes certain sources of knowledge. You know - a badge, a college degree, but certainly not answers from people who may have 30+ years of gardening experience.
So, I have an idea. Go to Google and do a web search. Copy & paste the exact line you see below: "cooperative extension" new york
But, substitute your state for "new york". In the search results, you should see links to sites that probably will end in .edu. Poke around in those results, find a phone number, and call your CE service for some advice. They will most certainly tell you to have soil tests done from various locations in your yard. And, I'll bet you a year's salary that they will NOT go along with your massive peat moss debacle.
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When I mow my yard I collect the cutting and put the clippings in my garden, down the isles and around all plants. My garden looks like it has a green carpet in it. I do this each time I cut grass. It keeps the ground moist and warm in the early Spring and through out the season. After everything is harvested at the end of the season I still put clippings on and in the Spring I deep till it all in. I have had good luck doing this for years and the soil is a black humus. However, I DO NOT put the clippings on the garden if I had recently sprayed for weeds, dandelions, etc. I wait a week or so and after a rain or heavy watering to continue spreading the clippings. I think it is a waste to always mulch or bag the clippings for the waste hauler. For one thing it is doesn't cost anything and why waste money on peat moss? I would only use it for planting trees and shrubs. I live in Illinois. My 2 cents worth.
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Hopefully, you don't use your clippings around edible crops.
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Don't do it to your kids.
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Chop them up and spread the clippings around the edible crops?
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The clippings are good, except that he said he uses a few lawn chemicals on his grass, and at some point afterward, the clippings end up spread around his vegetables. Since none of the chemicals sold for lawn care have been, or ever will be proven safe, this is risky.
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It was a bad attempt at a joke...chop up the kids, use them as mulch...nevermind. The joke failed so badly, cpr won't save it. Might as well print it out, chop it and spread it among the plants.
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Got it now. :)
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Your original question was: "Someone was telling me that they can use a shredder-blower to shred peat moss and spray a think layer of it all over your lawn after putting down grass seed, then you water and it helps keep the moisture in and start the seed so it doesn't dry out."
"What do they call the blower that can do that and what do they usually cost?"
No one seem sable to tell you what the blower is called, nor what they cost, as no one has actually heard of this process being used to mulch grass seed. Moreover, no one actually seems to think it will work and/or is worth trying, myself included. Why do you not go back to the person who told you this information and quiz them further?
rob
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Sounds like you're talking about some variant of hydroseeding/hydromulching. The smallest, lightest duty unit I've ever seen was about $3-4K, if I recall correctly. Big ones, self-propelled, I believe are in the $100K+ range. And chopped straw, sometimes with a tackifier, is typically used. Sphagnum's a pretty primo product for such a use.
If you really want to go this route, I'd look for a big landscaping company of the type hired to seed golf courses or estates or highway cuts.
Personally, I've started a lot of lawns over the years with nothing more than scattering seed by hand over worked up soil, raking and treading it in, and adding a topping of compost or mulch if I've got it handy. Watering is the big key to the project, which is why I tend to renovate lawn in the fall, just before the rains start.
Kay
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With new construction and no grass at all, some landscapers have a truck that blows a green slurry over the intended lawn area. I don't know what all is in the slurry, but I believe it includes a starter fertilizer, some fast growing ryegrass seed, a slower growing better grass seed, and plenty of green dye. The idea is you get an instant lawn, first consisting of the green dye, replaced by the rye grass, which in turn is replaced by the better grass. The sprayer they use is quite large, and I have never looked for nor seen one for sale, and I would think it would be wasteful for a homeowner to purchase such a large machine for a single use. If you want this done, contact a landscaper, but I would think a good landscaper would use the more traditional method of checking, smoothing, and rolling the soil, sowing the seed, raking it in, putting some kind of protective covering over it, and watering frequently until the lawn is established. Incidentally, installing a sprinkler system before doing this is an excellent idea, as you can set it to keep the soil moist during germination.
The protective covering is to keep the birds from eating your seed. When I do a small area, I cover it with the plastic equivalent of cheesecloth; it lets in the light and water and air, but keeps the birds at bay. For a larger area, I buy some straw and strew it over the area, it doesn't protect from the birds as well, but gives generally good results, and you don't even have to pick it up; the grass will grow through it, and it will eventually decompose. Note that I said straw, not hay. Hay is full of seeds and you don't want that unless you are starting a hayfield.
Mama Bear wrote:

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Hi,
I am a home owner with a bad lawn not a professional. I have tried using peat moss and it did work quiet well. I put down the peat moss just spreading it around with a shovel. Then I sprinkled seed and some fertilizer. Then plonked more peat moss on top.
I kept it watered using a ordinary hose and sprinkler on a timer. Worked quite well.
I got my peat moss from home depot as well as the grass seed. I live in New York and I did this last fall round about September time. Grass came up in about 5 days.
The advantages of peat moss over top soil and other admenments I think is easy of spreading it around.
As for a blower I have one of these as well. I did not use it to spread the peat moss around though. The blower I have is a RedMax 8001. It is a back pack blower. I suppose you could use it to blow stuff around, but not quite sure how that would help?
Good luck with your lawn.
warmest regards, Mike.
Mama Bear wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

And you could have had the same results with less water if you didn't have to provide enough water to both keep the peat hydrated and have enough left over for the seeds to germinate. You wasted money on the peat, and then you wasted money by having to water more.

Unless you mix the peat into the soil, there is zero advantage to using it. In fact, if you just spread it on top, it's a waste. A waste of peat. A waste of water. And a waste of effort. The peat has no nutriative value, and if it's not mixed in the soil, it does nothing to help the soil at all.
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I see two significant advantages to using peat as described -- it reduces the frequency of waterings that are needed and surrounds the seeds and provides them with a constant level of humidity. It sounds like a good idea to me.

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Question: In 30+ years of gardening, I've have never seen any advice indicating that peat moss did NOT need to be mixed into soil. Never. Not once, and this includes gardening veterans like James Crockett, Alan Lacy, Henry Mitchell, Fred McGourty, Russell Page, Christopher Lloyd, etc. They were gardening for 30-50 years before I even began. None of them suggest that it's a good idea to just sprinkle peat moss on top of soil.
What evidence do you have that suddenly makes this a good idea?

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