Seedsaving...Correcting brooklyn1/sheldon

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Charlie wrote:

Interestingly enough, that one was crossposted, and didn't make to it rec.gardens.edible, where I saw the rebuttal but not the original. I don't seem to have missed much, but I am wondering just what's wrong with the wet blotter (actually, wet paper towel) mode. How else would you know if your 10-year-old tomato seed is still good? (It is).
I haven't gardened either. For the past sixty years, give or take.
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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On Mon, 13 Apr 2009 15:40:00 -0400, Gary Woods

Exactly.
I pulled some 10 year old heirloom 'mater seeds out of the freezer two weeks ago, planted three seeds in each pot, ten pots of the old seeds, and had 100% germination. Now comes the hard part...the killing!
Also have white current tomatoes starting their third generation. Wonder how they will be this year. The second generation differed slightly from the first, in that they were slightly larger and less yellow cast to them. Just as sweet, though.

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Just a couple of points to make for seed savers:
If you are growing heirloom corn, your planting times must be at least 2 weeks apart to avoid cross pollination and polluting your genetic material. If you are growing corn in a commercial corn growing area, it's about a 99% chance that you seed will contain GM material.
You cannot save seed from squashes (they will cross) unless you beat the other pollinators and net the fruit.
Beans will cross pollinate as well, so plan to have only 1 variety blooming at a time.
Good post Charlie, I usually agree with about everything you post. I just thought this should be added.
Steve (fading back into the background) <Charlie> wrote in message >

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wrote:

Very good points, Steve, and I'm glad you did. Oftimes I am too brief about what I post and rely upon people to research for themselves...preachin' to the choir, so to speak. Thanks for the pointer, intended or not. ;-)
As far as the corn, I have been reluctant to start on that path yet. I have about five/six pounds of different heirlooms in cold storage. We sit smack dab in the middle of Corn Central, danger zone for sure.
I guess I am saving my seed for some type of collapse scenario, with the first year going to propagate seed for the following year. At first I thought you could just plant a small amount and save seed. As it turns out, it takes quite a few plants, (recessiveness/regressiveness?? I forget without looking) and I am short on space too.
Finding open-pollinate, GM free corn seed is becoming more difficult and more expensive.
I'm telling ya', sometimes it's hard to force oneself to only plant one variety of plant per year. Been meaning to save cuke seed for five years, but every year I wind up planting several varieties....grrrrr.
Don't fade too far back, Steve.
Charlie
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<Charlie> wrote in message > wrote:

I grew some Hickory King corn last year that I had stored in the freezer (I use pint canning jars & lids) for at least 10 years. The germination rate was just under 80%. I don't get a much better rate on seed bought for the current year. Steve

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Unless you hand pollinate. They showed us how at the Seed Saver's convention.
And beans don't cross all that easily. Again, refer to the Holy Writ by Ms. Ashworth.
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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I bought a butternut squash from the supermarket the other day saved the seeds and planted them. They germinated fine, im curios to see what comes of them. I'm hopping no cross pollination.
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Hopefully, the farmer who grew the squash had a big field of nothing else, so the local pollen grains got there first. As others have said, the squash family are about as promiscuous as they come.
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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