Seed dryer

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I'm looking for plans for a homebuilt seed dryer to dry the seeds from my garden. It could be either solar or electric powered. If anyone can direct me to an appropriate site etc. I'd be appreciative.
Also if someone could send me the URL for vendors/manufacturers of home garden type seed dryers I'd appreciate that.
TIA, EJ in NJ
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On Sat, 04 Jul 2009 13:24:10 -0400, Ernie Willson

Silica Gel
Charlie
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As usual Right On.
<http://forums.seedsavers.org/showthread.php?tP8
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA


http://www.youtube.com/usnationalarchives

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On 04/07/09 20:17, Charlie wrote:

Or on a few layers of paper kitchen towel over a layer of washing powder.
Ed
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Ed wrote:

I understand the reference to silica gel, and it looks attractive.I do not know what washing powder is. Is it baking soda?
Thanks, EJ in NJ
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What sort of seeds are you wanting to dry?
I just leave seeds on my kitchen bench on a piece of paper towle or even just in a small glass bowl to dry before I store them.
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FarmI wrote:

Mostly I am drying flower seedheads and vegetable seeds. Flowers include Coreopsis, Asters, Shasta Daisy, Heliopsis, Marigold, Zinnia and Gallardia. Vegetables include Tomato, Summer Squash, Peas, Radish, Eggplant and Peppers.
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Unless you live in an extremely humid area, why do you need a seed drier?
As I mentioned, my kitchen bench works fine for drying the seeds I keep or indeed, the plant itself where I leave a lot of seed heads to mature because I figure nature knows best how to do it and why should I interfere given that I can just harvest the seeds when dried.
I mention humidity because that can certainly spoil some seeds but in most circumstances, anywhere that you can survive, your seeds will too until you are ready to store them.
I save my tomato seeds by fermenting them for a few days in an old jar with some water, then run them under running water and then dump them out onto a piece of kitchen paper towel adn then leave them on the bench till the paper towel and the seeds are dry. I then just roll up the paper towel and store the whoel thing till time to plant when I just either peel the seeds off the paer towle or tear the towel into tiny bits and plant the seed on the towel.
Since I've never had any problems with seeds drying on the kitchen bench and especially the tomatoes which are sodden when I lay them out to dry, I'm wondering why you'd go to the expense of buying a seed drier?
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FarmI wrote:

I'm sure that what you are proposing will work, but I'd like to dry the seeds faster than I believe it can be done on my Kitchen counter etc.
Thanks
EJ in NJ
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Why fermenting? Straight question.
Does anybody ferment any other plant seeds before drying?
TIA
Persephone
then run them under running water and then dump them out onto a

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Tomato seeds straight from the tomato have a slimy coating (think snot like). Leaving them for a few days in water gets rid of the slimyness and then all you have to do is pour them into a kitchen sieve and run a bit of water on them and then dump them onto a bit of kitchen towel wait for the whole bit of towel to dry, roll it up and put it away till tomato seed planting time..
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Having done that, I just spread the seeds out in the sieve and point a small desk fan at it. They dry in a couple of hours.
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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Fermenting is reputed to kill some pathogens. It definitely breaks down the gel sac around each seed, making them much easier to handle once washed and dried. The Seed Saver's Exchange farm in Iowa has a huge German-built machine to extract tomato and other seed (think a Foley on steroids), but they still add water and ferment the tomato seeds for a few days.
Gary Woods AKA K2AHC- PGP key on request, or at home.earthlink.net/~garygarlic Zone 5/6 in upstate New York, 1420' elevation. NY WO G
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On Sat, 04 Jul 2009 13:24:10 -0400, Ernie Willson

It's easy to put a 75-watt bulb a few inches over a tray, or you can but an electric blanket under a tray.
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On Sat, 04 Jul 2009 13:24:10 -0400, Ernie Willson

I should have further explained...
Weigh an amount of silica gel equal to the weight of your seeds or whatever you are drying and place one or the other in something to keep them separate and place all in an airtight container....ziploc or whatever...for *seven* days.
Remove and store in airtight container.
Silica gel can be rejuvenated and used forever.
Suzanne Ashworth is the definitive voice with regards to seed saving and methods of seed propagation. "Seed to Seed" is the Holy Writ.
You can also follow the advice of others and get good results, but if you want seeds prepared for long term storage and that will maintain their viabilty and high rates of germination, this method is primo.
Storing seeds prepared this way, and then stored in the freezer will maintain them for a long long time. I have seeds that have been in the freezer for ten years that I planted this year and germ was as good as new.
Charlie
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Charlie wrote:

Charlie,
Thanks for the great explanation.
EJ in NJ
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<Charlie> wrote in message> Suzanne Ashworth is the definitive voice with regards to seed saving

"Each to their own", said the old woman as she kissed the cow.
I find that book irritating and always reach for "The Seedsavers Handbook" by Jude Fanton (sp?) in preference. "Seed to Seed" is for me, like Eliot Coleman.
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FarmI wrote:

I use "Saving Seeds" by Marc Rogers. It seems OK to me. EJ in NJ
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On Jul 5, 11:01pm, Charlie wrote:

I use Silica Gel to dry flowers and herbs from the garden. I get mine from www.silicagelpackets.com, they have Silica Gel that is packaged in Tyvek which meets the FDA's requirements for being packaged with food. Works like a charm every time and much faster than air drying.
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Nomadic Mom wrote:

Thanks for the lead. Looks like good stuff. EJ in NJ
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