Scotish flower ID

I've been asked if I can identify a flower a friend saw on a visit to Scotland, but I'm not having much luck.
It was growing wild in the grounds of a ruined Abbey, and there is a picture of it here.
http://www.ttforumfriends.com/images/forum/f1.jpg
I'd be grateful if anyone can help.
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http://www.webster-dictionary.org/definition/Siam%20Tulip is very similar... siam tulip Curcuma alismatifolia

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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.co.uk (Isatis) wrote:

It is probably a Prunella (called self-heal), probably Prunella vulgaris:
http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/B8C.HTM#SELF-HEAL
Self-heal (Prunella vulgaris) also known as hook heal, all heal and woundwort, is a low perennial herb of the family Labiatae native to Britain and Europe where it grows in grasslands, woodland clearings, hedgerows and on waste ground. It has a creeping rhizome which bears erect or ascending, square, red-tinged stems, branched below. The leaves are opposite, stalked, ovate and entire or serrate. The flowers are purplish in colour , two-lipped and arranged in dense, terminal, rectangular, spike-like panicles. The corolla has a hooded upper lip . The fruit consists of four smooth brown nutlets, each with a ridge running from the apex to the base. The flowering stems are used medicinally as an anti-inflammatory and haemostatic.
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This description of Prunella vulgaris makes it even more certain:
SELF-HEAL
Family LABIATAE Prunella vulgaris
Commonest by the wayside and in damp pastures, and abundant throughout Britain.
It is a perennial with a creeping rootstock, with ascending flowering branches, three to twelve inches high. The stem is square and the stalked leaves are long, oval in shape, with either toothed or entire margins. Both stem and leaves are more or less HAIRY.
The bracts of the flowerspike have PURPLE EDGES. The lipped flowers are mostly purple, sometimes white or crimson. There are four stamens. There is a peculiarity in the form of the stamens worth noting. The filament branches at the tip, and one branch bears the anthers whilst the other is pressed against the upper lip. The flowers are dimorphic, large and small-the large perfect, the small having no anthers.
The plant is also known as Carpenter's Herb, Hook-heal, Sickle-wort and Prunella. In olden days it was considered one of the most useful medicines for inward and outward wounds.
Flowering from July to September.
[from The Observer's Book of WILD FLOWERS Compiled by W. J. STOKOE, 1973]
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(Isatis) wrote:

Hmmm, looks along the right lines.
Much thanks.
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