Scorched Oleanders

My large oleander bush was partially scorched during the October San Diego Fires. Part of it is still green but 2/3 of it looks scorched, although not burned.
What's the best way of dealing with this: Take it out (if it cannot be expected to recover), trim it back to 4 feet to stimulate growth, or wait and do nothing?
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Walter
www.rationality.net
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On 1/31/08 10:38 PM, in article 47a288ac$0$14195$ snipped-for-privacy@free.teranews.com,

I have no direct experience with oleanders, but time and patience are your best friends. Give it at least 6 months to tell you want it needs.
C
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On 1/31/2008 7:38 PM, Walter R. wrote:

Oleanders are easily renewed with severe pruning. Wait until the beginning of March. Then, cut to about 2 feet. With not much water (they're drought tolerant), they can regrow to their full size within a single year.
However, a blight is killing oleanders throughout southern California and beyond. When I had a slope failure regraded, I wanted to replant the oleanders that had been there before. I had tall white oleanders up the sides and shorter hot pink across the top. Both the grading contractor and the landscape contractor advised against it. The landscape contractor indicated that I would have to replace them within five years.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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